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the Mafia wreaks havoc on New York City but the government allows to bring them down I think this is a perfect time to question undercover agents put their lives on the line you had to be very willing to take risks the evidence mounts and they discovered a secret inner circle of mafia bosses who control nearly all underworld activity who was electrified they were working together the questions and answers the story behind the mob on trial next New York City 1980 the largest metropolis in the United States is overrun by an illegal organization known as La Cosa Nostra Italian for our thing it's most commonly known as the Mafia the organization has influenced nationwide but five powerful crime families rule the city and the bosses of these families call the shots the suspected leaders Gambino boss big Paul Castellano Genovese boss Anthony Fat Tony Salerno Bonanno boss Phillip rusty rastelli Lucchese boss Anthony Tony ducks Corallo and Colombo boss carmine the snake Persico each boss sits at the top of a highly organized hierarchy of under bosses captains and low-level soldiers and associates more than 1,100 men in New York City alone the men on the bottom carry out the dirty work the soldiers were the ones who did the loan-sharking the robberies or frauds they brought the money in but unlike a lot of other institutions in the Mafia the money flowed upward everybody had to kick up some of that money comes from the mobs illegal influence over legitimate industries such as trucking gore meth sanitation and construction companies mob families have always tried to operate in pretty much the same way they move into whatever legitimate businesses they could as a way of giving themselves legitimate earnings as well as earning money by shakedowns of legitimate businesses the mobs operations cast a climate of fear over New York murder arson and car bombs are some of their favorite methods of persuading reluctant citizens to play by the Mafia's rules if you defy them you never know what's gonna happen to you they have no compunction about killer law enforcement targets the mobs rackets like gambling extortion and loan-sharking but bringing down mobsters has been a challenge organized crime investigation by the very nature are the most difficult because you're dealing with experienced criminals career criminals so there's some of our surveillance conscious they don't talk on the phone they don't put their names or signatures on paper for paper trails for all their hard work law enforcers only bring down the occasional boss and defense attorneys are able to negotiate short prison stays the mafiosi returned to the streets and the entire enterprise remains strong 1980 New York FBI office Special Agent James kossler takes over as coordinating supervisor for the FBI's organized crime squad he's determined to overhaul the way the bureau fights the mob his luck would have it it was at a time when organized crime was very important to the government Ronald Reagan became president and he made that one of his priorities 20 miles away in White Plains New York Ronald goldstock steps in as the new director for the state organized crime task force or Oct F for a decade the task force had been pursuing its own mob investigation but has never nailed a big case it was essentially a defunct organization and what we tried to do was think of how you could deal with the problem of organized crime not biind ighting and convicting individual persons but by taking out entire crews kossler and gold stock both come to the same realization about how they can take down the mafia by using a decade old federal law known as Rico or the racketeering and corrupt organization Act Rico allows law enforcement to go after groups of criminals the key is to prove the existence of an enterprise connected to illegal activity with Rico prosecutors don't need to focus on a single day or crime they can reach back to establish a pattern of offenses prosecutors can target top mobsters who are usually insulated from the crime those who give orders but rarely commit crimes themselves Rico is designed to work with a wiretapping law called title 3 which allows recorded intelligence into federal court the intent of Congress was to make the RICO statute able to use the history of organized crime and tie it together was title three and used those two tools in tandem this was not something we had been doing a lot if Rico is the ideal weapon Lyons law enforcement sat on it for ten years few authorities fully comprehend the act and no one wants to be the first to try it the man who wrote the law G Robert Blakey tells the final report the Department of Justice discouraged its use out of fear they might lose a high-profile case what they were not gonna do is treat any of their important cases as experiments with this new thing they want a precedent for it nobody wanted to be first but now someone is ready at the FBI James Koestler fights to reorganize the bureau's entire mob strategy we would normally just look at the crimes that a group of people who are committing try to prosecute them for committing the crimes and we never looked at the group as a whole cos Allah creates five separate organized crime squads and orders each to investigate a corresponding mob family their target the bosses by nabbing those on top they hope to dismantle each family's infrastructure we had a plan and we were sticking to the plan we're gonna go after the hierarchy of the family meanwhile at the state organized crime task force Ronald goldstock starts his own investigation focusing on the mobs hold over industries and labor unions he knows the mob has a history of controlling corrupt union officials who skim employee funds and threatened worker strikes in exchange for payoffs Rico was not only a theory of prosecution but a theory of investigation we thought about not so much families but industries and thought about how you could stop the mob from continuing to operate the agencies jump start their investigations hoping to bring down each family and boss individually April 1982 the New York Times runs a series detailing mob influence over the city's billion dollar a year construction industry because of the mob stranglehold on concrete suppliers costs are 70% higher in New York City than in much of the Northeast but the big bosses in the New York crime families decided to create a cartel in which they would get the major concrete contractors together and give them this ultimatum we're going to divvy up all the contract you won't have to compete anymore the mob then takes a 2% cut of every deal so contractors raise their rates to cover the extortion chosen contractors who split kickbacks with the Mafia bosses are known as the concrete Club refusing to join as serious repercussions you had no choice but to join the Association and abide by its rules and failure to do so would cause economic harm physical harm even death investigators see concrete as a way to make their case but they still need hard evidence they hope for surveillance and wiretapping campaign where mobsters might implicate themselves on tape is the key to bringing them down October 14 1982 President Ronald Reagan declares the Mafia's power is reeling out of control the existence of this nationwide criminal network and its willingness and too often its success in corrupting and gaining protection from those in high places is an affront to every law-abiding American to him the reasons for the mob success are clear vows of secrecy and loyalty insulation of its leaders from direct criminal involvement bribery and corruption of law enforcement and public officials he orders the FBI to forge closer ties with New York state authorities both agencies will launch an extensive surveillance campaign to infiltrate this secret world what we were doing was so important so excited that we wanted to accomplish this the secrets they hear will open the door to the mob underworld that along with more questions and answers when the final report continues 1982 New York City nearly all 7 million residents here indirectly paid tribute to the city's five ruling Mafia families the garment industry the waterfront the Fulton fish market garbage collection every aspect of construction there was no aspect of any big industry critical industries in New York at the mob didn't get a share they controlled you know all kinds of legitimate businesses that you know increase the cost of those businesses goods and services to John Q public FBI in state task force agents want to end the mob stranglehold they hope to gather evidence of a criminal enterprise through widespread wiretapping but breaking through to the tightly guarded mob underworld will be dangerous one of the greatest assets that the Mafia has and had and still has is that they'll kill you they'll break your leg to go after your family members agents start investigating mafia hangouts the best locations for capturing crucial information December 1982 Brooklyn New York FBI agents take out Casas toward a restaurant the suspected meeting place for the Colombo crime family family boss Carmine Persico sits in prison but agents suspect he still has some control in the rackets Carmine Persico was trying to maintain his connection with the crime family his underlings and run the crime family the way he saw fit Joe canta Meza supervises the FBI's technical operation squad his goal to learn the ins and outs of the restaurant before planting a critical wiretap a little bit in advance we have the opportunity to conduct the little surveillance physical surveillance of the subjects in the location he stakes out the area looking for ways to infiltrate the Colombo family hangout is there a window that I could leave unlock can I see where the keys are kept or anything that might help the actual certissue sentry go smoother or quicker while dining there canta Meza observes that the Colombo's use one table for official mob business you'll need to gain access to the crawlspace overhead to make the bug effective it's a dangerous mission if any Colombo members catch him in the act he could be murdered 3 a.m. on a December night Cantor Meza and other agents pick a lock on the restaurants metal gate to gain entry they access a cramped crawl space and plant a microphone but their work isn't done the agents realize they need to risk reentering the next night to attach the transmitter unless you get to look in the details in the nooks and crannies see the crawlspace sometimes you just can't do it all in one night they return to the restaurant and risk getting caught on the mobs home turf but after an hour the agents escape unnoticed the jobs a success agents become particularly interested when they overhear the conversations of a key mob soldier in graph scope oh they run a background check on scope oh and find that he's also president of the new york concrete district workers council this is a key fine infiltration of labor unions is the cornerstone of the mobs economic success along with being a Colombo soldier it gave him sway over contractors who were involved in major construction projects in Manhattan FBI agents realize they need more information and plant bugs in scope pose office and car they discover scope Oh uses his position to threaten worker strikes the concrete suppliers afraid of lost business and profits pay off the Colombo's to keep the Union off the picket lines those companies who work in both the public and private sectors make up the so-called concrete club investigators believe that exposing this extortion record could bring down the entire family including boss Carmine Persico scopa was the guy who made sure that each of the crime families got their cut there was one conversation where a Colombo soldier was talking to him about a big major construction project that he was looking to get involved in and scope Oh made sure to tell him that no no wait a minute it's ten million dollars the Commission has to get a piece of it this isn't the first time authorities have heard this term but they still wonder what is the Commission investigators believe it's the mobs ultimate ruling body over the years earlier wiretaps have vaguely mentioned the Commission but investigators know little to nothing about it though they believe the five New York bosses sit on the board agents believe that these men have the final word on mob policy and business but have no hard evidence confirming its existence further conversations confirm that scope au doesn't just work for the Colombo's he collects payoffs for all five families the boss is also the ingredient again with the other bosses in the scheme the bosses were all participated in equally these conversations are exactly what investigators were hoping for solid proof of a major criminal enterprise that involves every New York family if authorities can link the families together they'd have the chance to take them all down at once with the RICO Act a loose-lipped mobster will help them build their case along with more questions and answers when the final report continues March 1983 New York City federal and state authorities have launched a widespread wiretapping campaign against the New York Mafia while investigators pore over Colombo family conversations the state task force target suspected Lucchese boss Tony ducks Corallo investigators suspect Corallo controls garbage collection on Long Island and that he conducts his business from the backseat of his drivers black Jaguar xj6 we recognize that if we had a bug in the car we could overhear the conversations and we would not only have a better understanding of the industry but we'd have the evidence to do what we wanted to do the taskforce knows it will be a difficult job radio interference and limited transmission ranges have made previous car bugs useless this man tony angelo who still works undercover for the task force is determined to make this bugging successful we went to a car dealership provided the same car and we got to look at and find out how we were going to approach this angelo and other agents practice installing wiretaps and an exact copy of the jaguar Corallo uses once inside they determined they'll need five uninterrupted minutes to finish the job March 23rd as Karolos driver attends a dinner dance on Long Island his Jaguar sits empty in the parking lot sit down dinner so it was gonna be like at least three hours long so we feel that was our best shot three agents descend on the car their moves are quick and precise he had to take a portion of the car apart install the device and then put it back together without it looking like it was taken apart using strips of electrical tape they attach a microphone and a transmitter to the inside of the dashboard then they connect the two devices to the car's battery which will provide them with power the job takes less than 10 minutes and the agents dispersed there were a lot of challenges that we had to meet and we met him it was a big accomplishment but there's an immediate problem recording they're constantly moving wiretap to do it tailing agents use a receptor to receive signals from the Jag then transmit them to a recording van a mile away their hard work pays off Sal Avellino the inquisitive driver for Tony Corallo leads his boss into some incriminating conversations within days we had Corallo saying that he was the boss of the Lucchese crime family something that had not been done before Karolos admission that he's the boss implicates him in the organization and helps investigators prove their RICO case agents continue to trail Avellino they overhear a conversation with another soldier about Lucchese family plans to control city garbage collection by wiping out their competition the state task force pours over hours of tape it was exciting because every day he would expose more of what they were up to and you'd find out all kinds of details about how they thought but constantly trailing the men and not getting caught proves difficult you had a be in reasonable proximity to the vehicle to listen to it now the problem was that Corallo and Avellino were very cautious Corallo himself would adjust the rearview mirror so that he could watch behind them they were very conscious of tails the agents keep their distance and over here Sal Avellino talking about growing resentment against suspected Gambino boss Paul Castellano fellow mobsters believe Castellano has become too greedy and is taking a bigger cut of the profits than he deserves this implicates Castellano in a mob racket but authorities still need the Gambino's on tape the FBI is on the job staking out Castellanos stately Staten Island home March 1983 Staten Island New York big Paul nicknamed for his imposing six foot two inch frame took over his boss in the 1970s he projects the image of a sophisticated Wall Street banker but manages more than four hundred foot soldiers who carry out his dirty work that way Castellano doesn't have to commit the crimes himself but investigators hope he'll discuss his role in the rackets on tape the FBI turns once again to Joe canta Meza the agent who successfully bugged the Colombo hangout in Brooklyn intensive surveillance breaks into several pieces one of course is the location to see who comes and goes second is the subjects are those that have access to the location who has the keys who has alarm codes Castellanos home has many obstacles an extensive alarm and video surveillance system and a constant flow of associates coming and going there was rarely if ever an instance that the house was not occupied by someone canta Meza tells the final report he and another agent poses cable television repairman to access Castellanos home it's a dangerous operation blowing their cover could result in death it had to be very daring and very willing to take risks calculated risks the other agent keeps watch outside while canto Meza figures out where to install the bugs and transmission lines this transmitter will allow agents to eavesdrop from a listening post in a nearby apartment canta Meza knows from tipsters that Castellano conducts business at a large table near the kitchen and decides this is the perfect place for the bug the agent solicits the help of a Gambino soldier to make the job less suspicious when I'm with the subject they and they want to watch they get to help now that maybe hold the wire hold a flashlight can you hold a screwdriver he successfully plants the microphone and leaves the house undiscovered the microphone install went as planned and worked perfectly until the lightning thunderstorm that evening the storm halts transmissions to the listening post canto Meza will have to re-enter the home luckily Castellano and his bodyguards by the repair act a few hours later big Paul's voice comes booming across the transmissions from those conversations on that bug the FBI managed to prove that Paul Castellano was the head of the Gambino crime family and that there was some connection between all five families the connection that all five families are in on the construction racket the so-called concrete Club it was electrifying you came to realize very very quickly that these families were not distinct and apart they were working together now that investigators know the mob operates as one organization run by a commission of bosses they can do something they never thought possible use Rico to prosecute all the families together the significance hadn't really become clear until after the job was actually performed investigators also learned that there's a rift in the Gambino family and a captain named John Gotti isn't happy with Castellanos increasingly greedy ways John Gotti and his crew were key members of the you know blue-collar wing of the Gambino crime family and were known to be at odds with Paul Castellano authorities monitor both factions of the family and hope to destroy the Gambino infrastructure before members do it themselves may 1983 investigators monitor the Gambino's but still haven't connected all the dots about the commission they continue listening in on the taps when former boss Joseph Bonanno now retired in Arizona publishes his memoirs in a book called a man of honor as 78 years old the ailing Mafia Don wants the world to know mob kinship has been replaced with extreme greed he was no longer a big-shot but he was trying to do in a sense was suggested by his life why is bonanno's book significant for investigators Bonanno includes an entire chapter explaining the commission according to Bonanno the Commission was born in New York City in 1931 the Mafia realized a committee of men one from each major family would prevent unnecessary infighting the Commission settles any territory or financial disputes between rival mobsters and protects the bosses by establishing that no one can kill a boss without the Commission's approval here is Joe Bonanno one of the original heads of the five families writing a book which reveals the existence of the Commission and how it operated in one wiretap immediately go wild in response to bonanno's book the other bosses are furious Bonanno broke the mobs code of silence Paul Castellano was caught on tape saying they're gonna make this one big tremendous conspiracy how could he do this this idiot August 1983 Ronald goldstock head of the New York organized crime task force approaches US attorney Rudy Giuliani with a pitch bring the separate crime family investigations together into one Federal Court case prosecutors can use Rico to target the bosses even though the guys on top didn't commit the crimes they're the key to the organization I laid out the theory that we had developed about the Commission case and he was very receptive the key to bringing down the mob is proving to a jury that a criminal enterprise exists everything from the wiretap to bonanno's book can be used as evidence former prosecutor Gill Childers tells the final report Giuliani zeroes in on bonanno's memoir when he read that he said my god this guy is admitting to the entire structure of organized crime we've got to be able to do something with this but prosecutors face a major setback when one of their key defendants meets a violent end on the streets of New York that night I suddenly realized this is this is real that's next when the final report continues September 1983 FBI and state Task Force agents are in the midst of a widespread surveillance campaign against the New York mob they've already bugged some members of the Commission like the bosses of the Lucchese Gambino and Colombo families and are compiling some hard evidence such as this conversation of a Lucchesi capo and Driver four family head Tony ducks Corallo recounting a disagreement he had with the head of a local union [Applause] investigators work isn't done they have tape of bosses and under bosses admitting they run rackets and families but still need to crack another suspected member of the Commission Genovese boss Anthony Fat Tony Salerno despite his low-key profile salerno is one of the wealthiest mobsters based in Harlem he controls a ten million dollar a year loan sharking racket East Harlem New York December 1983 FBI agent Joe canto Meza checks out the Palmer boys social club salerno's favorite hangout he hopes to record meetings between salerno and his top henchmen without the taps prosecutors will have a difficult time linking the Genovese crew to the entire operation the agent immediately spots a challenge a huge metal grate that's blocking the entrance and guaranteed to make a lot of noise we had information from the surveillance activities that after this particular grate was unlocked it was one of the noisiest roll-ups the surveillance team had ever heard before to solve the problem canta Meza has a diesel powered garbage truck pull up outside the targeted location and we were ready to roll up the grate you couldn't hear yourself think patrons identify salerno's conference table they enter the cellar below and drill into the floorboards to hook up the transmission line can temesta finds himself crawling among rats to planked above it's not a comfortable way to be running wire and sticking your hands in places that you can't quite see just before dawn canta Meza completes the job later that day salerno's deep voice booms across the wires they had Fat Tony Salerno talking about the Commission on his tapes that were you know picked up on the bug in the Pomeroy social club agents now have bugs of every major crime family in New York but they're still looking for proof that commission members gather to discuss the rackets may 15 2014 at a residence on Staten Island most Commission meetings are so heavily guarded and in places authorities would never suspect that they have never been surveilled a soldier in each of the crime families would drive one of its leaders to a specific secure location essentially it's designed to be in a location at the FBI and law enforcement would not suspect agents take out the residence from a van a few blocks away hoping to get photographic evidence of the bosses together for the first time one by one the bosses file out of the house each caught by FBI cameras the cameras capture Paul Castellano Fat Tony Salerno Tony ducks Corallo and several other monsters we have photographs of all the different bosses and thereunder bosses or and/or their number-one capo or somebody that their aid going into the house the case against the bosses is so extensive wiretaps the detail rackets and photographs of the bosses together that the mobsters themselves suspect something is up including Karolos driver February 1985 with hard evidence in the form of photographs and wiretaps US attorney Rudy Giuliani is ready to reveal a massive indictment there was a tremendous amount of energy everyone understood that this was going to be a complete groundbreaking case but before the official announcement local news stations receive a tip about the plan one station calls FBI supervisor Jim Koestler for comment I said we've got a problem you know these guys will check themselves in the hospitals they'll get be on the run whatever it might be we got to do this now a band of federal agents and cops race across New York City to make arrests within an hour police arrests the biggest players Gambino boss big Paul Castellano Lucchese boss Tony ducks Corallo and Genovese boss Fat Tony Salerno carmine the snake Persico he's presently in federal custody on another charge naming him boss of the Colombo crime family Bonanno boss Phillip rusty rastelli is not indicted but is also already in jail on other charges retired boss Joe Bonanno claims medical incapacity and refuses a personal plea from Rudy Giuliani to cooperate February 26 1985 this is a very major blow against the mafia in New York and I think it helps throughout the United States because ooh Leone officially announces the 15-count indictment against the New York bosses and representatives from the five crime families prosecutors charged the nine men participated in a nationwide commission that controlled mob activities including drug trafficking loan sharking gambling and labor racketeering the indictment doesn't keep all the wealthy bosses off the street for long December 18th 1985 Gambino boss Paul Castellano is free on a 2 million dollar bond Giuliani and the FBI believe their strongest cases against Castellano he runs an extensive operation with more than 500 associates but investigators know from key wiretaps the many family members are deeply dissatisfied with Castellanos leadership we heard about some secret meetings and we knew something was up but we didn't have any specific information about it 5:45 p.m. rush hour traffic fills the streets of midtown Manhattan Castellanos black sedan pulls up outside sparks a steakhouse on 46th Street as Castellano opens his door men in trench coats descend upon the car three gunmen opened fire on the boss sending six bullets into his head and torso the assassins shoot his underboss Tommy Bilotti four times the gunman escaped into the thick crowd of pedestrians Castellanos head rests on the door jamb of the car his under boss's body lies in a pool of blood on the street both men are pronounced dead at the scene I was very much struck by the gravity of the case that night I suddenly realized this is this is real these guys are out there killing each other and terrorizing people it was very sobering within hours investigators target the man they believe has the most to gain from Castellanos death Gambino captain John Gotti agents hear from informants that Castellano wanted to disband Gotti and his crew after they were busted for drug trafficking Paul Castellano was furious at John Gotti and his crew he blamed his crew for the problems he was facing god ease power grab works insider's report that Gotti became head of the family soon after Castellanos murder what does Paul Castellanos death mean for the case against the Commission prosecutors have to throw out several bug conversations from his Staten Island home with big Paul gone those wiretaps can't be used in court the prosecution's lost hours of conversations that prove the Gambino's have a seat on the commission when suddenly that chair becomes empty from the jury's perspective it's a piece of the story that is now missing despite the major setback prosecutors elect to go ahead without the evidence on Castellano he was kind of a classic Hollywood image of what a mob boss is it took some of the sex appeal if you will out of the case but there was still an awful lot left while the prosecution is confident they still face a case unlike any tried in history you're going to hear an answer today like you've never heard before the trial is next on the final report September 8 1986 jury selection for the Mafia's Commission trial begins at the Federal District Courthouse in lower Manhattan US attorney Rudy Giuliani has appointed 32 year old Michael Chertoff as lead prosecutor the young lawyer must convince a jury that these mob bosses sit on a dangerous board of directors known as the commissioner and that they direct the criminal enterprise known as the mob you never sure what a jury is going to do but we were very confident that we had a powerful case in his opening statement Michael Chertoff argues the Commission is a corrupt Enterprise dominated by a single principle greed the audio recordings are his centerpiece like this tape of a Lucchese captain discussing his family's control over the garbage collection Union the key defendant is Columbo soldier Ralph's capo accused of accepting payoffs from concrete firms scope owned laid out the racket on the wiretap they had Ralph's culpa on tape talking about the fact that the Commission was controlling construction projects in New York City they really didn't need the testimony of the witnesses the recordings from the extensive four-year investigation feature several of the accused they're caught talking about the Commission and its crimes the most compelling evidence was the tapes because you hire their actual voices in some third party it isn't some ex-con who's testifying to get a reduced sentence it was there in all the prosecution puts 85 Witnesses on the stand and presents over 150 audio tapes September 18 1986 defense attorney Samuel Dawson who's representing the underboss of the Lucchese tells jurors something that has never been said in open court the Mafia and the Commission exists it was very surprising no defense lawyer had ever before conceded that there really was a such thing as the Cosa Nostra why does the defense admit the Mafia exists it's impossible to refute the hundreds of hours of taped evidence what they argue being a member of the mob doesn't make someone a criminal is riding around in that car and there wasn't one word that came out of his mouth criminal defense attorneys depict the Commission as an underground business circle it doesn't authorize murder but settles disputes to avoid conflict defense lawyers were stuck and trying to figure out a strategy trying to do something with these defendants November 19 1986 after five days of deliberation jurors deliver their verdict Fat Tony Salerno Tony ducks Corallo carmine the snake Persico and five of their associates guilty on all charges it was a complete victory and complete vindication of the whole theory that underlay lots of effort to prosecute and combat the Cosa Nostra the sentence that follows 100 years without parole the maximum in a RICO conviction Corallo Persico and Salerno are locked away for life that was a mind-blowing event that captured the attention of the community that hey there is a way to get these guys off the streets forever in the final report the Commission case sets a precedent for law enforcement to use Rico across the country the RICO statute becomes the preferred method for combating many types of organized crime like urban gangs while Rico affects New York's five families it does not stop them the FBI finds a new generation of bosses replaces the imprisoned leaders in 1988 authorities discover a major error in the Commission investigation informants reveal lead defendant Anthony Salerno is not the boss of the Genovese family been wrongfully identified the real boss Vincent the chin Gigante had been directing operations from behind bars if you find out now how ignorant the FBI law forcement was about the Mafia they really only had scraped the surface it's still insufficient grounds to overturn salerno's conviction Fat Tony dies in prison in 1992 the death of Lucchese boss Anthony carajo follows in 2000 of the three big commission case defendants only Colombo boss Carmine Persico remains alive he allegedly runs the Colombo family from Butner Federal Correctional Carolina mob rules allow him to maintain his rank while incarcerated the five families never completely relinquish their hold on New York's construction industry for its labor unions on September 11th 2001 the World Trade Center attack turns into a mafia money pit mobsters are linked to companies that rake in sixty three million dollars for debris cleanup while the mafia continues to operate in major US cities the FBI says only New York and Chicago maintain some semblance of their original framework though there are new bosses in place RICO convictions have all but crushed the Commission the once almighty ruling body is still rumored to exist but not likely to regain the same control they once had the overall clout of the Commission has certainly dissipated many of the crime families are in disarray the bosses of all crime families have been convicted time and time again I think what it says is that it's not night time but it's dusk the Sun hasn't set on the organized crime but it's but now someone is ready at the FBI James counselor fights to reorganize the bureau's entire mob strategy we would normally just look at the crimes that a group of people who are committing try to prosecute them for committing the crimes and we never looked at the group as a whole Khosla creates five separate organized crime squads and orders each to investigate a corresponding mob family their target the bosses by nabbing those on top they hope to dismantle each family's infrastructure we had a plan but we were sticking to the plan we're gonna go after the hierarchy of the family meanwhile at the state organized crime task force Ronald goldstock starts his own investigation focusing on the mobs holdover industries and labor unions he knows the mob has a history of controlling corrupt union officials who skim employee funds and threaten worker strikes in exchange for payoffs Rico was not only a theory of prosecution but a theory of investigation we thought about not so much families bought industries and thought about how you could stop the mob from continuing to operate the agencies jump start their investigations hoping to bring down each family and boss individually April 1982 the New York Times runs a series detailing mob influence over the city's billion dollar a year construction industry because of the mob stranglehold on concrete suppliers costs are 70% higher in New York City than in much of the Northeast the big bosses in the New York crime families decided to create a cartel in which they would get the major concrete contractors together and give them this ultimatum we're going to divvy up all the contract you won't have to compete anymore the mob then takes a 2% cut of every deal so contractors raise their rates to cover the extortion chosen contractors who split kickbacks with the Mafia bosses are known as the concrete Club refusing to join as serious repercussions you had no choice but to join the Association and abide by its rules and failure to do so would cause economic harm physical harm even death investigators see concrete as a way to make their case but they still need hard evidence they hope for surveillance and wiretapping campaign where mobsters might implicate themselves on tape is the key to bringing them down October 14 1982 President Ronald Reagan declares the Mafia's power is reeling out of control the existence of this nationwide criminal network and its willingness and too often its success in corrupting and gaining protection from those in high places is an affront to every law-abiding American to him the reasons for the mob her present most difficult because you're dealing with experienced criminals career criminals so there's some of our surveillance conscious they don't talk on the phone they don't put their names or signatures on paper for paper trails for all their hard work law enforcers only bring down the occasional boss and defense attorneys are able to negotiate short prison stays the mafiosi returned to the streets and the entire enterprise remains strong 1980 New York FBI office Special Agent James kossler takes over as coordinating supervisor for the FBI's organized crime squad he's determined to overall the way the bureau fights the mob his luck would have it it was at a time when organized crime was very important to the government Ronald Reagan became president and he made that one of his priorities 20 miles away in White Plains New York Ronald goldstock steps in as the new director for the state organized crime task force or Oct F for a decade the task force has been pursuing its own mob investigation but has never nailed a big case it was essentially a defunct organization and what we tried to do was think of how you could deal with the problem of organized crime not biind ighting and convicting individual persons but by taking out entire crews kossler and gold stock both come to the same realization about how they can take down the Mafia by using a decade-old federal law known as Rico or the racketeering and corrupt organization Act Rico allows law enforcement to go after groups of criminals the key is to prove the existence of an enterprise connected to illegal activity with Rico prosecutors don't need to focus on a single day or crime they can reach back to establish a pattern of offenses prosecutors can target top mobsters who are usually insulated from the crime those who give orders but rarely commit crimes themselves Rico is designed to work with a wiretapping law called title 3 which allows recorded intelligence into federal court the intent of Congress was to make the RICO statute able to use the history of organized crime and tie it together was title 3 and used those two tools in tandem this was not something we had been doing a lot if Rico is the ideal weapon why is law enforcement sat on it for 10 years few authorities fully comprehend the act and no one wants to be the first to try it the man who wrote the law G Robert Blake II tells the final report the Department of Justice discouraged its use out of fear they might lose a high-profile case what they were not gonna do is treat any of their important cases as experiments with this new thing it won't a precedent for nobody wanted to be first the Mafia wreaks havoc on new york city but the government vows to bring them down I think this is a perfect time to question undercover agents put their lives on the line you had to be very willing to take risks the evidence mounts and they discover the secret inner circle of mafia bosses will control nearly all underworld activity who was electrified they were working together the questions and answers the story behind the mob on trial next New York City 1980 the largest metropolis in the United States is overrun by an illegal organization known as La Cosa Nostra Italian for our thing it's most commonly known as the Mafia the organization has influenced nationwide but five powerful crime families rule the city and the bosses of these families call the shots the suspected leaders Gambino boss big Paul Castellano Genovese boss Anthony Fat Tony Salerno Bonanno boss Phillip rusty rastelli Lucchese boss Anthony Tony ducks Corallo and Colombo boss carmine the snake Persico each boss sits at the top of a highly organized hierarchy of under bosses captains and low-level soldiers and associates more than 1,100 men in New York City alone the men on the bottom carry out the dirty work the soldiers were the ones who did the loan sharking the robberies or frauds they brought the money in but unlike a lot of other institutions in the Mafia the money flowed upward everybody had to kick up some of that money comes from the mobs illegal influence over legitimate industries such as trucking garment sanitation and construction companies mob families have always tried to operate in pretty much the same way they move into whatever legitimate businesses they could as a way of giving themselves legitimate earnings as well as earning money by shake down south' legitimate businesses the mobs operations cast a climate of fear over New York murder arson and car bombs are some of their favorite methods of persuading reluctant citizens to play by the Mafia's rules if you defy them you never know what's gonna happen to you they have no compunction about killer law enforcement targets the mobs rackets like gambling extortion and loan-sharking but bringing down monsters has been a challenge organized crime investigation by the very nature success are clear vows of secrecy and loyalty insulation of its leaders from direct criminal involvement bribery and corruption of law enforcement and public officials he orders the FBI to forge closer ties with New York state authorities both agencies will launch an extensive surveillance campaign to infiltrate this secret world what we were doing was so important so exciting that we wanted it to accomplish this the secrets they hear will open the door to the mob underworld that along with more questions and answers when the final report continues 1982 New York City nearly all seven million residents here indirectly pay tribute to the city's five ruling Mafia families the garment industry the waterfront the Fulton fish market garbage collection every aspect of construction there was no aspect of any big industry critical industries in New York at the mob didn't get a share they controlled you know all kinds of legitimate businesses that you know increase the cost of those businesses goods and services to John Q public FBI in state task force agents want to end the mob stranglehold they hope to gather evidence of a criminal enterprise through widespread wiretapping but breaking through to the tightly guarded mob underworld will be dangerous one of the greatest assets that the Mafia has ahead and still has is that they'll kill you they'll break your leg to go after your family members agents start investigating mafia hangouts the best locations for capturing crucial information December 1982 Brooklyn New York FBI agents take out Casas toward a restaurant the suspected meeting place for the Colombo crime family family boss Carmine Persico sits in prison what agents suspect he still has some control in the rackets Carmine Persico was trying to maintain his connection with the crime family his underlings and run the crime family the way he saw fit Joe can't a Mensa supervises the FBI's technical operation squad his goal to learn the ins and outs of the restaurant before planting a critical wiretap a little bit in advance we have the opportunity to conduct the little surveillance physical surveillance of the subjects in the location he stakes out the area looking for ways to infiltrate the Colombo family hangout as there a window that I could leave unlock can I see where the keys are kept or anything that might help the actual surreptitious entry go smoother or quicker while dining there canta Meza observes that the Colombo's use one table for official mob business you'll need to gain access to the crawlspace overhead to make the bug effective it's a dangerous mission if any Colombo members catch him in the act he could be murdered 3:00 a.m. on a December night canta Meza and other agents pick a lock on the restaurants middle gate to gain entry they access a cramped crawlspace and plant a microphone but their worth isn't done the agents realize they need to risk reentering the next night to attach the transmitter unless you get to look in the details and the nooks and crannies see the crawlspace sometimes you just can't do it all in one night they return to the restaurant and risk getting caught on the mobs home turf but after an hour the agents escape unnoticed the jobs a success agents become particularly interested when they overhear the conversations of a key mob soldier in graph scope oh they run a background check on scope oh and find that he's also president of the new york concrete district workers council this is a key fine infiltration of labor unions is the cornerstone of the mobs economic success along with being a Colombo soldier it gave him sway over contractors who were involved in major construction projects in Manhattan FBI agents realize they need more information and plant bugs in scope OHS office and car they discover scope Oh uses his position to threaten worker strikes the concrete suppliers afraid of lost business and profits pay off the Colombo's to keep the Union off the picket lines those companies who work in both the public and private sectors make up the so-called concrete Club the investigators believe that exposing this extortion racket could bring down the entire family including boss Carmine Persico scopa was the guy who made sure that each of the crime families got their cut and it was one conversation where a Colombo soldier was talking to him about a big major construction project that he was looking to get involved in and scope Oh made sure to tell him that no no wait a minute it's ten million dollars the Commission has to get a piece of it this isn't the first time authorities have heard this term but they still wonder what is the Commission investigators believe it's the mobs ultimate ruling body over the years earlier wiretaps have vaguely mentioned the Commission but investigators know little to nothing about it though they believe the five New York bosses sit on the board agents believe that these men have the final word on mob policy in business

Hotel Brothers (2021) Documentary Trailer HD



In 2008, two brothers, Lucas & Travis Boychuk, at the age of 19 & 21, moved to Nicaragua to build the world’s first action sports resort. Amidst every possible challenge brought to them including police corruption and almost being killed at gun point, the two brothers successfully completed and opened the first resort. The documentary follows them from day 1 until the opening day of the first resort, and now throughout the whole process of building the 2nd Surf Ranch resort which expands over 25 acres and will be one of Nicaragua’s largest resorts. &

willing to sleep in a tent in the jungle to build an action sports resort and that's what they do it's like being on another planet this is the biggest challenge of our lives and it sounded like a rad idea but they had a ton of work now as a world man you know maybe this could work looking forward yeah second one should be insane you

The Dark Side of Tulum (Documentary)



An independent documentary exploring both the beauty and betrayal of Tulum, Mexico – and what can be done to change it.

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Businesses, organizations, and people seen or mentioned in the film:

Red Tulum Sostenible

Woolis Green Industries

Farm to Table Tulum

No Mas Plastik

Tulum Recycles

Holistika

Radio Tulum

Oceanic Global

Habitas Tulum

Alejandro Duran

has quickly become one of the destinations in the world [Applause] Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula here in this tropical climate the elevation is low and the land is flat there are no surface rivers or streams however just below the ground lies a vast system of the world's largest underground river a combination of geological events led to the development of this unique ecosystem over 65 million years ago the Yucatan Peninsula was a giant reef covered by several feet of ocean during the last major ice age sea levels dropped and exposed the ancient reef the coral and it's dependent Maureen life would not survive jungle eventually grew over the limestone platform that was left behind after centuries of erosion a massive cave system was born slightly acidic rainfall dissolved the alkaline limestone and made its way through the ground carving a vast network of caverns and tunnels inside the caves otherworldly formations can be found millions of stalactites stalagmites and columns decorate these mysterious places some the size of a pencil and others larger than trees growing at a rate of just a few centimeters per year as the ice age came to an end glaciers melted sea levels rose and the caves flooded the volume of water in these rivers is so great that it cannot exist above the surface it filters its way through the soft porous limestone and settles underground it is the only source of freshwater throughout the entire Yucatan Peninsula and like almost all rivers on earth it eventually flows to the sea history has been found here carbon dating of artifacts and skeletons preserved perfectly by the crystal-clear water reveal that humans have been visiting these caves for over thirteen thousand years many of these caverns eventually collapsed creating what we know today cenotes the subterranean rivers and their natural sinkholes which serve as an entrance to this spectacular world the mayans referred to these sacred sinkholes as the notes which they believed was an entrance to the underworld were their gods and spirits reside the ancient Mayans were king astronomers measuring time and interpreting cycles of the stars many of their most important buildings were aligned to correspond with them the Mayans were philosophers mathematicians artists architects and warriors it was they who first understood the concept of zero and they who first cultivated cacao papaya and corn they developed complex and accurate calendars and perfect pyramids of immense size all while much of Western Europe remained in the dark ages the Mayans have always known that Tulum is special but it is magical in fact Tulum is the largest of just three coastal Mayan cities where high priests were once trained and for reasons unknown this great civilization left this sacred land some say it was warfare others believe that the Mayans may have exhausted the environment around we'll tulum meet a similar fate as it seems we may not have learned from our past we can all remember a time when we were pushed just beyond our comfort zone a time when we experience the thrill of something new something exhilarating a moments when the complete unknown when from scary to wonderful creating a sudden shift that forever divided our lives into the floor and after this is exactly what happens for many of us when first discovering Tulum it's as if a wave of clarity washes over you and you ask yourself why have I not been living here my entire life in recent years Tulum has become a diverse community of artists chefs musicians healers entrepreneurs and explorers thousands of people from all over the world now call this place home and who could blame them Tulum truly provides everything that you could ever need here you will find clear turquoise water compliments of the Caribbean Sea the world's largest underground river for cave divers and thrill-seekers the second largest Barrier Reef system for marine lovers and coral experts throughout the area there are 92 known Mayan ruins and even more waiting to be unearthed and just south of the city the incredible seeing calm biosphere a protected unesco world heritage site extending for nearly 600,000 Hector's each year there are more than 300 days of clear skies for those who worship the Sun there are thousands of mammals birds and reptiles and endless jungle for the Wild Ones in tulum the food is fresh the music is alive and the atmosphere is captivating what more Cantera dice possibly have to offer every day you're seeing new areas of the jungle being torn down it's really devastating a lot of these projects kind of have like an eco eco name about them but when you really dig deep and you look at everything that's going on there's absolutely nothing ecological about them Heather Froemming has been living in this area since 1998 back then it was home to less than 4,000 people now just twenty years later there are nearly 40,000 people living here plus an astonishing 2 million tourists per year you're seeing things grow really fast and unfortunately there is no master plan there is no infrastructure in place to deal with that kind of growth the city itself is only designed to support roughly 10,000 people two looms population has grown far faster than development of urban facilities could keep up and despite claims of environmental support by most business owners – looms natural environment is that serious risk I think that there needs to be a lot more community involvement on the part of business owners who are coming here and really not giving back to the community into the environment and in fact destroying it for profit really that needs to stop especially if you're gonna be selling it as this natural paradise well you have to protect natural paradise you have to keep the mangroves you can't be filling them in to make another parking lot or to make more rooms the mangrove is so unbelievably important to the natural environment here and every single day more mangrove is getting filled in this is illegal and it needs to stop immediately the mangrove is our filtration system it's our septic system or natural way of cleaning the water and all the water that goes through the mangrove systems and out into the ocean is filtered and clean so that you have a nice clear Caribbean ocean so that you can have coral reefs without the mangroves you do not have those conditions so the entire reason that people come here for the beautiful you know turquoise water and the white sand beaches and the coral reefs is due to the mangroves and the saddest thing ever is to watch people coming here making money and making a lot of money off of the resources off of the beauty of this place and filling in the mangroves that's a tragedy it's it's ridiculous and that's something that has to stop now and it is no surprise that two looms reef is already feeling the effects sadly this coral has died it is very important to understand that all of Earth's ecosystems are connected if one is vulnerable the whole is compromised tulum needs all of its individual ecosystems to function properly in order for the collective to thrive and much like the human body one malfunctioning organ will disrupt the entire system as we know the reefs are in danger the reefs are are really disappearing there is no secret about that the reefs are under constant threat so we cannot just ignore that everything is connected and we are adding problems to the width we have problems in the reef because of the global warming acidity of the water acidity of the atmosphere and we are adding more so we shouldn't be surprised that everything is dying and everything is getting deteriorated we are being part of the problem and we need definitely to be part and to be responsible to lumes environment is especially delicate and complex due to the enormous underground river that flows beneath our feet think of this system as the veins of the earth and when they become damaged the entire area is affected unfortunately these freshwater veins are being heavily polluted from a multitude of there is a massive landfill right in the middle of the jungle just a few kilometers from town it has not been categorized or measured which is standard practice for waste management and hazardous pollutants are currently leaking into the supply of freshwater fecal matter is constantly being poured directly into the aquifer as a result of faulty sewage systems and irresponsible development throughout the urban area in Toulon like 20% it's sending their wastewater to the treatment plant so it means that is 80% the city that we don't know where the wastewater goes or well we do know it's going into the underground this video was taken in 2006 directly beneath the streets of Tulum and yes this is human fecal matter it's difficult to watch and even more difficult to imagine what it would look like today while many places do have individual on-site wastewater treatment facilities most are poorly maintained and often leak or worse the systems are inadequate intended for just 5 to 10 people while serving an establishment of over 100 I think it's it's it's amazing that we are in the 21st century and we know better the surface of the Moon than there are underground systems and we are in the largest and biggest underground rivers of the world and we need to tell the world it's comparable to the Amazon and to the average but because it's hidden underground is not so obvious and maybe we flush the toilet and it's coming straight into the underground water system so my advice to people that want to come and buy land and and do development it's like oh you cannot do development on the cost of the beauty of this place and for those who deny that to lumes environment is at risk let's take a look at Playa del Carmen a city just 60 kilometers north of Tulum also facing environmental devastation in 1998 Playa had roughly 20,000 inhabitants today the population is well over 200,000 and is expected to reach 2 million by year 2025 what once was a pristine coastline and jungle has been replaced by concrete I really think that we're not prepared for the amount of growth that's happening now and that's going to happen because if you compare it directly to what happened in Playa there's so many correlations and basically the situation is almost identical and this exponential growth does not have the infrastructure in place in order to take this into consideration to make the bad news worse beaches at popular travel destinations around the world have already started to close due to contamination and if we're not careful this can happen in Tulum in a place where the likes of Leonardo DiCaprio spends his holiday and Yogi's from around the world come for holistic retreats how have things become so bad well for one part real estate developers have not been very helpful heavily advocating for new projects and pushing sales another reason is serious corruption and negligence from the government and business owners some establishments have even been shut down by profepa Mexico's Environmental Protection Agency but somehow they remain open for business we have been experiencing not very convenient development and it has to do a lot with some corruption and some things that shouldn't be authorized and without arise in the past and even in the present but we just cannot put a finger and blame the authorities and blame the politicians because in corruption we have two sides we have the side that gets the money and we have the side that keeps the money as well so why punishing just one side just by putting your finger on one side we have two sides as well there are countries like Rwanda in Africa where law gives punishment to both sides and then corruption vanishes and there is certainly no shortage of money in tulum as the world's elite continued to arrive this is evident from the area's extremely high prices and also evident from the amount of money spent on just fuel alone a majority of the beach hotels for an entirely undies all generators they collectively spend over eight point five million dollars a year to power their so called ecological establishments consuming roughly nine million litres of fuel which is enough to drive around the earth nearly six thousand times as prices in the area have skyrocketed wages have not some people making as little as $4 per day when the classified is so obvious the poor community often has no choice but to pollute and sometimes they even resort to stealing crime is also on the rise and intensely this is a big problem that if you don't get a hold of it early on can get really out of control I think and so as a smaller community I think those are some of the things that we have to look at before we can keep growing – looms ecosystem has been perfectly engineered to create an environment unlike anything else on earth will we destroy the land that has already given us so much or will our community pull together and finally change things tulum is just a small representation of a much larger issue happening across the globe the collapse of our natural world it is time now to collectively move away from that narrative towards a more honest and sustainable society the sepal claims of environmental practice are happening everywhere and now more than ever we must be aware of the dangers of this false information for instance while plastic pollution is a major issue recycling is not the answer nor is bioplastic these are merely band-aids only 9% of all paths that can actually be recycled and as we've seen in tulum most of our plastic is not separated and sits in landfills no plant-based plastic will ever biodegrade in these conditions does that mean you shouldn't continue to recycle of course not any effort is better than no effort and tulum recycles is trying their best to create a cleaner community please do what you can to support them another example of falsification is that solar panels are the answer for clean energy sure power from the Sun is great in theory but what many people don't know is the high cost at which it comes it may seem like an appealing alternative yet solar panels often contain harmful materials such as lead and cadmium these rare earth metals which are highly toxic when mined and processed take a heavy environmental toll on soil and water and those who work and live near the mines tend to suffer so what happens to these panels after they no longer work well just as plastic they are not so easy to recycle and are considered hazardous when no longer in use and don't forget similar metals are found in our smartphones and computers so when it comes to environmental devastation we are truly all to blame now let's be clear the intentions of these alternative solutions are inspiring but why not direct that momentum towards something that is sustainable on all counts one technology that actually imitates Earth's natural geological process is creating clean sustainable renewable fuels from waste this means that no new carbon is being released into the atmosphere which is the leading cause of ocean acidification and global warming and the reason that fossil fuels have such a bad reputation this innovative process uses water heat and pressure just as the earth does to turn our waste into energy it has even received high validation from the US Environmental Protection Agency supplying clean renewable fuels from trash while using existing infrastructure means we can address two problems quickly waste and energy it is not just a compelling alternative to fossil fuels but one that goes against the current trend it makes plastic waste highly valuable technology such as this are promising and will soon be available but there are many things we can do right now to create change in tulum money must be used for development of necessary infrastructure such as connecting more urban areas to the wastewater treatment plant and creating better practices for waste management there are density laws and building regulations that must be followed this means you should not be building multiple units on a piece of land that is permitted for just one nature is our most valuable commodity so please don't risk the environment simply for a cheap condo and a so-called better return on investment thank you to those of you who are doing things right and for leading by example and to the ones who are doing things wrong we are tired of your mess please invest in proper infrastructure and stop taking shortcuts otherwise as the land of Tulum begins to crumble so will your profits remember the reason you make so much money is because of this businesses must without exception have adequate wastewater treatment facilities if you are not already aware sargasso's seaweed is not a result of ocean plastic it is caused from excess nutrients in the water more commonly known as fecal matter so by pumping your sewage into the ground you are directly contributing to the mass production of the same algae that is driving your clients away also please be aware of your energy consumption water conservation and waste management don't yield a lot of economic benefit but energy conservation does if you decrease your energy consumption your savings can then be used for protecting and restoring the damaged environment as we see here for the average hotel in tulum a shocking 60 percent of energy is consumed from just air-conditioning alone although you may be new to this place please be aware of your surroundings so if the Wi-Fi is out or the shower pressure is low or the a/c is broken understand that you are in the jungle and such luxuries should not be expected nor demanded please do not use sunscreen as it is killing our coral but if you must make certain that it is reef safe and verify every single ingredient to avoid false advertising please do not visit this place and then leave your waste behind bring a refillable water bottle stay at hotels that want more than just profit and eat at places where the food is locally sourced and most importantly ask questions as a paying customer you have a right to know what they do with your waste thank you to those of you who have been doing your part the locals are the heart of this place you know the ins and outs of Tulum you know who is doing things right and who is doing things wrong join red Tulum so Sandy Bay an organization that is already empowering the community and pushing for proper legal framework get involved support honest businesses and don't give your money to those who are not this will create pressure forcing them to finally do things differently the Mayans believed that obsidian was the reflective mirror of truth that it was the consciousness of duality between right and wrong between light and dark acknowledging that one cannot exist without the other and that's what the dark side of Tulum is a mirror for all of us to reflect upon and decide whether we want to remain part of the problem or be part of the solution it's your choice which one will you choose you you I took on this project for quite a few reasons but I think the main reason that I took it on is because I really do love to loom and it makes me really really heartbroken that it is being destroyed and then it's not being taken care of we just keep taking and taking and taking and we're not giving it the respect that it deserves tulum has given me so much to be thankful for and I want to give back to Tulum and the best way that I can and this project is that way for me I really had no idea what I was getting myself into there's been days where I've wanted to give up but there's also been days that I've been really inspired and really hopeful and I want to be able to look back and say to whom was amazing but look how amazing it is now you know I don't want to look back in 10 years and say wasn't it great when we used to go to Tulum I want to still be going there and at the rate that it's going now I don't know if that will be true but if we see the change that most of us are hoping for and if we keep pushing and we all keep playing our part we will see change and we're gonna look back and say you know we did it we did it you you you

Restoration Man: Derelict Windmill (Before and After) | History Documentary | Reel Truth History



Former childhood sweethearts, Chris Kelly and Sue Hindle, fall in love with a tiny field house and plan to convert it into their first home together.

Each episode features a home owner who is restoring an unusual building by converting it into a residential dwelling. Architect George Clarke tours the British Isles and on his way discovers some of the finest examples of windmills, follies, gate houses, ice houses, towers, and churches. The series focuses heavily on the architectural and historical significance of each of these interesting and mysterious finds.

Welcome to Reel Truth History, the home of gripping and powerful documentaries. Here you can watch both full length documentaries and series that explore some of the most comprehensive pieces of world history.

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BBC Documentary "Andrea Bocelli" pt.5



Documentary about Andrea Bocelli, from childhood to international star….. This documentary gives you information from how he became blind to how he became a Doctor of Law and how he got the passion for music that he has. He is an international star known around the world by the sound of his magnificent voice that will forever be appreciated and loved by many generations to come.

If you want to see more videos of him visit my channel (AndreaBocelli77)

Us, Naked: Trixie & Monkey (FULL DOCUMENTARY)



Trixie and Monkey dream of bringing their unpredictable and peculiarly glamorous act to a world wide audience. They relocate to a New England circus school to study acrobatics and trapeze. On the weekends they relentlessly test-drive their act on the stages of Baltimore rock clubs, Vegas casinos, and New York City theaters, all-the-while annihilating anything conformist in their path. But financial uncertainty, physical exhaustion, and romantic tension leave them questioning if they will make it as artists and what success even means.

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The Princeton Learning Cooperative Documentary



The Princeton Learning Cooperative is a center that
helps teenagers live & learn without school by
supporting teens to create personalized educations
based on their interests, abilities and goals.

Princeton Learning cooperative supports teenagers to leave traditional public private schools and create a life and education for themselves based around what they're interested in what their abilities are and where they see themselves going in life one of the things that a lot of people don't sort of know about the u.s. educational system is that you don't need a high school diploma you don't need to attend traditional public and private middle school in high school in order to move on and have a successful life and including going to college including to do anything that you want to do in life and so if that's the case if you don't have to go to high school you know what can you do with your time you know if you're not sitting in school for seven hours a day there's just an unbelievable amount of resources and opportunities to create the kind of life that you want once you step outside of that traditional system and so kids at the Princeton learning cooperative have done you know almost anything you can manage and starting a business you know building computers you know learning pottery taking classes at the local community college writing their own novels I mean the really when you start to look at it just the possibilities are endless so PLC supports teenagers and their families to use this style of learning a number of ways the first thing is just help planning right if you're not going to be in school for seven hours a day what is it that you want to spend your time on and then we also have a lot of academic support so we have a full calendar of classes we have you know help kids set up one-on-one tutorials and various topics all of our full-time members have a staff mentor that they meet with individually each week where they plan and track progress we help our kids with college admissions down the road if that's where they're planning on going we help them find internship and volunteer and work opportunities in the community we also provide a safe and comfortable community where kids can come and work and socialize the social aspect of PLC is kind of the foundation for all of the work that we do here because it shows how we come together as people and not with any prescribed relationships ahead of time in terms of mentoring or teaching or working together on projects we just come together as ourselves to play games to hang out to chat about things and we're a group of people who just gets together on a regular basis to live life together we get to build trusting fun authentic relationships without any ulterior motive so that whenever we do get involved in a project or our class or a mentoring relationship we're building on top of something and that whenever we're doing any of those other things were doing them as whole people who choose to do those things together we found out about PLC at a farmers market I can't remember where the farmers market exactly was but uh Paul was there actually and when and we just stopped and asked and we found out there was an open house going on and so a few weeks later we went to the open house and so when we got there I met you and Allison and I think I saw Paul again and then we just learned all about you know seeing how it worked and I actually joined like a few days after I really didn't like the school environment like the public school environment from moving to from Princeton or moving to Princeton it was very difficult to find a school and so when we found this it I really like the idea of just getting to decide what you want to and study what you want to set up having to be stuck on a certain guideline one of the first things I was getting into some programming some history and some math and my mom really wanted me into English and writing so that was one of the early things I did in the beginning of the year math was it wasn't a strong suit of mine and and by the end of the first year that I was at PLC math was became one of my favorite classes to take during the week and we were able to get tutors to come in or college students actually who would come in and teach the classes to the students um I didn't really like the system of how they were forcing the math down your throat a little bit where you felt if you didn't do well enough you were gonna be made fun of or you were dumb or something like that I like that I was just able to kind of freely go through even though I'm in an advanced math now I still feel like if I do poorly in front of other people I feel like there's something wrong or you know it's bad but I I'm Matthew Stoll and I learned I mean even with English I just happened to start to like English writing and all that Monday's is a special day for PLC we tend to do outdoor activities or at least experiential activities such as we could go rock climbing we've done that quite a few times we could go down and do fossil hunting we can do rock scrambling or hiking we could also go to museums he even just visit a shopping center I have been to New York to the museum the mobile museum we're hoping to plan another New York trip it should just walk around New York and explore a little bit without actually visiting a museum basically the idea is that we should try and encourage students to learn while they're enjoying themselves apparently the brain is more receptive to new a new material new events when it's in a happy state so experiential learning is a big a big deal for PLC we're trying to work on that a lot rather than sitting in front of a blackboard and just trying to absorb information well high school I went to was an elementary school and everyone there didn't really understand the aspects of teaching correctly extra school was not the best not the teachers weren't that friendly people didn't really get along people weren't happy to go there that kind of stuff the basic of school stuff the experience at PLC it's uh it's interesting every day there's a lot of people everyone's nice no one's mean I wouldn't come if they were so the calendar of classes that we develop at PLC is really kind of unique and it's totally based on what our current members are interested in learning so we have very you know traditional kind of subjects in classes on like algebra 1 or biology but we also have really sort of eclectic classes as well they're just based on people's interests so for instance we have a class called into the woods where they go out and just learn survival techniques and fishing and these kind of things and also things you know like earth science and and some of these more you know everyday environmentalism some of these these classes are just based around our volunteers who come into works passions or kids interests the difficulties Cameron had with school impacted the whole family she first of all she was miserable a second she was ill she didn't feel well most of the time she was cranky she she didn't want to be with anyone she wanted she served just isolated herself and didn't really want to interact with with us with her friends she just you know it threw everything into a turmoil because our entire our entire family life was concerned with well what about Cameron how's Cameron gonna you know if we have to go here if we have this family event for the day is Cameron gonna go if she is not well enough to go can she stay home by herself we've seen Cameron grow so much since she's come to PLC she has really kind of taken control of her life I would say that I you know I I never recognized or see myself as much of a control freak but when Cameron the the more trouble she had in school the more I felt they need to step in and take control to the point where I was I felt like I was telling her what to do and and that probably contributed to her not taking control and not not feeling you know her the anxiety that she felt I think since coming to PLC she has recognized that she's in charge of her own life and she can make her own choices and she's demonstrated that by the things that she's that she's done since she's been at PLC she's you know she's taken advantage of an internship she's gotten a couple of part-time jobs she's taking classes at County College she's she's really sort of started to show an interest in sort of divergent areas where I don't think in high school she would have had you know that it would have that it would have been that obvious that she has these these different interests okay so I teach into the woods it's a wilderness survival class indigenous music class any kind of just anything in the woods I try and teach kids about what run a survival shelter building fishing any kind of primitive survival techniques any kind of just sustainable living anything that they can just eventually support themselves with if they wanted to just the skills and the craft of how to take what's provided for you already in nature's bounty and just I guess just sort of use it to your best advantage is the great learning experience for me to be at PLC I'm learning a lot more than I thought I would I've learned a lot about how to teach kids better how to relate to kids in different age groups from teaching the kids at PLC I wanted to join PLC because I wanted to be working with young people to help them do the things that they wanted to do I had a lot of success and a lot of fun working with young people in math classrooms sharing math with them helping them make projects and all kinds of cool stuff but it was always sort of constrained by the things that we were supposed to be doing and I was really interested in seeing what kinds of things I could help young people do whenever there weren't any constraints at all whenever we could just come up with great ideas and follow our passions and that's what I've been able to do so far here at the LC which is super exciting PLC is great and I feel really welcome here because it's less stressful and everybody's really willing to go the extra mile to really step out and give me a hand and what I need to learn for life I like PLC because it's fun and you know we're not forced to do classes that we don't want to you know take we can take what we want to take so way back in I think 2007 I managed to find on TED talks this great speaker called Sir Ken Robinson and it's still the most popular talk on TED Talks you know when you go to see what the most popular there is still the same talk from that he gave gave a long time ago about creativity as opposed to just remember I think the education system is broken basically throughout the world and he's wanting to spend more time on creating people who were creative rather than otherwise so eventually we met yeah I had read a book called the teenage deliberation handbook but Gracie Ellen which talks about kids you know leaving school and you know creating a life for themselves and through that book we found a organization of Massachusetts called North Star who are doing these you know great new things kids and so I sort of thought that's what it is I want to do and so Paul and I met through a mutual friend of ours it snipes farm and introduced us and so we met and we're like well let's let's do something you know let's create something new that's kind of just kind of work for those kids at the traditional school system didn't work for I guess we gathered together a whole bunch of friends and teachers and people who were interested in this kind of thing and started meeting I think once a month or so at my house and we just talked about what you think education is about and why do we need to do what we're doing and could we do something different and get the same results okay the results we want and out of that we developed a little group of I think five of us maybe and I became the the initial board I suppose of what was going to become Princeton learning cooperative ever since I came to PLC it's been a lot less stressful at home because I used to have a lot of homework and my mom and I would always fight about me doing it so now I don't have homework and I don't have to do it anymore we're not fighting at all anymore and I'm a lot more happy at home the mentoring program here at PLC is we offer all of the full-time PLC members a mentor a staff member who would serve as their mentor and that person would meet with them once a week and and other times if necessary and help them figure out their path through homeschooling through high school so what choices they want to make what's their long term goal and have that influences or impacts the kinds of things that they want to do right now so that they could also be enjoying life right now but also be leading in a direction that they're hoping to achieve later on we we work on both what classes the the teen is taking and how those classes are going and whether that sort of study works for them or if they'd like to try another method of study of a particular topic we also talk about work and internships what with what kinds of experiences what they like to be having right now and is there anything we could get set up there we talked about sort of being organized for applying to college later either a two-year Community College or a four-year college or what it is that they would like to do after after they're done they're sort of high school years of study on Wednesdays a lot of the members go out into the community and some of them will take classes at their community college some of them have jobs on Wednesdays internships and some of them also volunteer so with my time on Wednesdays what I usually do is I have worked in the morning which is a job that I got through PLC and then I also had an internship last year I volunteer at the animal shelter in Princeton near us I also added a class at Princeton University and I take a class at Mercer County Community College so PLC can be a life changing option for teenagers and their families and there's a lot of benefits that come from being involved at PLC one of them is just that the stress level for kids and their families comes way down when there's when there's not battles over sort of mandatory homework you know some kids come to us having three or four hours of homework at night at their school and then when that's not an issue anymore a lot of times relationships and families improve a lot a number of kids who were pretty shut down in school just because they did not know that system of learning didn't work for them being told what to do on a daily basis when they started to have more control over what they were learning and how they're learning and when you know when they're learning it just that their their whole attitude towards life and you know the excitement that they have around learning just comes back you know for more like when they were a little kid

Russian Royal Jewels (Documentary)



The Russian emperor surpasses everything in power and splendor.
The jewels are the biggest, the rarest and the most unmatched ones you know. Zar Nicholas II’s aunt, Grand Duchess Vladimir, is the absolute leader in jewelry throughout Europe.
During the revolution, her jewels are smuggled out of Russia by a good friend and it is only because of him that Queen Elizabeth II today can wear the famous Vladimir diadem.

No copyright intended.

Global Warming / Climate Change Documentary



Hi, this video was put together and narrated by me way back as a ninth grade school project. I hope it gives you insight and more knowledge about global warming. Please only post constructive criticism.

Go to for part 2 of this video.

BTW: This documentary took over 100 hours to put together, edit videos, record videos, make narration documents, list bibliography, etc, etc, etc

This is Draft 5 you are watching

Please enjoy

And just a side note ; I got a 99% and was chosen as the best documentary in the school haha.

Thanks For Watching =)

Remember Part 2 is at NOT REVVER anymore (Revver is constantly down, and the video quality has degraded, blip TV has FULL HD and is much better)

Thanks

Food, Inc. – Documentary Film Trailer | POV on PBS



Food Inc. A Documentary Film by Robert Kenner. The film airs on POV on April 21st.

How much do we know about the food we buy at our local supermarkets and serve to our families? Though our food appears the same as ever — a tomato still looks like a tomato — it has been radically transformed. In Food Inc., filmmaker Robert Kenner and investigative authors Eric Schlosser (Fast Food Nation), Michael Pollan (The Omnivore’s Dilemma) lift the veil on our U.S. food industry, revealing surprising facts about what we eat, how it’s produced, who we have become as a nation and where we may go from here.

MIKLO ("Blood In Blood Out" Documentary, Full Doc, English) *full docs for free*



Full Doc, Full Documentary, A Personal Documentary by Damian Chapa star of Blood in Blood out.

Director: Damian Chapa
Writer: Damian Chapa
Star: Damian Chapa

COPYRIGHT: All of the films published by us are legally licensed. We have acquired the rights (at least for specific territories) from the rightholders by contract. If you have questions please send an email to: [email protected]

hello my name is Damien choppa I've been making films for over 35 years I started films such as under siege with Steven Seagal Street Fighter with Van Daan and help adrenal with Faye Dunaway I've also started films with Tommy Lee Jones passed out a letter Maria Conchita Alonso and many more stars in Hollywood I've been very blessed I have such a wonderful career I even had the chance to work with Chris Tucker one of the most brilliant comedians of our time I even won the New York International Film & Video Festival Best Drama and best film award for Brandel unauthorized I was the only person in the world who ever to direct a film and play Roman Polanski I won best production and indie fest for this film however throughout my career no other film has ever touched or brought so much emotion to me as blood in blood out sanguine horse underneath blood into blood Allen has become a cult status film it has been released throughout the world international countries such as Japan in 1 the Tokyo Film Festival for the director terror actor many other countries are very very well in its presence such as Sweden in Germany France where it's called Princeton deleted which means Prince of the city many countries kept its name sänger it for Simon or blood in blood out of course in Latin America and of course Latino USA it's become a real household name and I've been very blessed to be a part of that many people know my character name as meat loaf or a level or milkweed this film has lived on and many people's hearts and minds what did what out changed my life it really as an actor it started my career but myself as a human being damien choppa it also led me on a journey to discover my Chicano culture I've done so many movies and been on so many sets and been all over the world but no film has been like the experience that happened over 20 years ago to me as a filmmaker as an actor it's been a great experience because that film was the foundation of my very existence as an actor I was born in Ohio and later on moved to New York City however I experienced many different people many different cultures however my father was Chicano and he was from Roth's town Texas and I was a little boy my father he sent me down to see Maya weather and mio ella was named Juanita Chaplin one of the greatest figures in my life I spent time in Ohio and then New York but when I finally went down to robstown aerobic or the roughs town the Cotton Pickers as people know it down there I began to experience something that really changed me as a person I began to understand more about my Chicano roots and I held on to my wonderful beautiful Indian face grandmother and I looked up at her and I wondered what was this mystery what was she about how was I a part of this my Spanish was not really that good when I went down to see my grandmother to experience my Chicano culture for the first time as a youth I did have some experience with my uncles all who spoke Spanish but I mainly wasn't around them as a young boy but when I was around them I started to feel and see the difference between my parents my mother being white and my father being jacana there were many differences in the culture and I began to understand a little Spanish so by the time I went to Rob's town aerobic I began to open up myself to this beautiful language and this beautiful culture my grandmother only spoke Spanish to me and it was a journey and an interesting way of learning Spanish because I was sort of forced into it because I didn't know much week after week I began to America me a letter and to learn things about my culture she would take me down the street of Main Street in Rob's town and show me all the different stores that had been there for decades and decades one of the stores my grandfather owned his name was Tesla's Jetta both my grandparents were immigrants from Mexico my grandmother happened to be American Indian and adopted by a wonderful Mexican couple who brought her up as a mexican-american of course the indigenous are mixed with the Spanish which is what makes Mexican I was very proud of this fact that my grandmother was a very high percentage of American Indian actually the tribe was Caren Cowan so many Mexicans mixed with Karen Collins and many Spanish mixed with Indians and indigenous tribes and created this multicultural aspect of the Mexican American experience I was blessed to have many sides by culturally and in this experience learning more about myself as a Chicano it opened me up or something that later on in my life I would never understand how perfect the synchronicity would be that I would play me clove Elka I noticed something when I was in the Mexican American culture I noticed a warmth and a love that I hadn't experienced as a child with my other cousins my cousins on the other side Hood spout off racial comments like taco boy wetback or what happened these things hurt as a child I also was able to experience the mexican-american when I went to Michigan with my wonderful Tia Norma idea my Enderman she would make me wonderful Mexican meals and accept me with loving arms also along with my three moles Jesse Turkey Rolando all my family I really really loved them very much they gave me such a warm inviting and something different than I had on the white side not to say that I didn't experience wonderful things on that side I did but there was something about the way the Mexican community embraced their weather it was really nice feeling to be accepted that way like I said Texas was a great place but I've experienced this feeling throughout the Latino world this acceptance and wonderful love for a level so basically what happened was I went in to read for the Academy Award director Taylor Hackford I was very nervous and it was the biggest part I never read for it was the ultimate film $35,000,000 Disney film one of the lead roles and a role that I felt did I deserve because I grew up like this I knew that I was right for the part but I did not have the experience that many of the other actors had they were up for the part and there were many famous actors up for the Parkers Miklos and many other much more experienced people in me so when I went in Taylor loosened me up a lot he taught me a lot about my experience as a young Chicano growing up I told him about my grandmother I told him about my grandfather I told him about the immigrants from Mexico my wonderful Diaz and deals were a part of this culture and my father who tried to send me to my grandmother's to make me understand who what I was I told them about these experiences and he seemed very enamored with this I think for him it would probably looking back be a great experience to see somebody who actually had the same elements as meatloaf not only superficial things like the light hair at the time and blue eyes and lighter complexion but growing up in this fight of trying to figure out where you fit in and I experienced many of those things I expressed that to the director so he made me feel very warm and welcoming and tried to get the best out of me which really helped so I read for him and I put everything into it but I was so nervous I think I remember jittery men in my hands were shaking throughout the breathing so I don't know if I did such a great reading but there were times and moments there was real that I felt it and I think he saw that so he looked at me and he said listen we don't have a lot of time at that point they were just about ready to cast the part and there were three or four people they had in mind already for me close so he looked at me said I'm gonna screen test you those other people I'm not saying you have the part but I'm gonna screen test you I thank them very much I've left the office I went home I studied the lines over and over and over and over again there were about four scenes one of which was the scene inside the prison where I talked to Montana and I tell him I'm white on the outside but I'm brown on the inside to the ballers and that scene was one of the scenes that I read and used as the screen test so I went in and I looked around at the scene it was the first time I'd ever been in a studio to do a screen test I was so nervous and here I had seen all these famous people that were up for my same role and I just felt a bit insecure and I didn't know if I could pull it off but something deep within me say you've got to try got to try hard and then something wonderful happened during the screen test I met Benjamin Bratt who was playing tako they were already cast him and Jesse Laredo and what happened was Jesse pareto came up to me told me some things about Texas and maybe relax and I looked and I saw something still familiar Jesse I saw a text mix and somebody there was so warm and loving and fighting and a real poet I mean Jesse have been a very famous guy when I was growing up already I mean I'm Jesse right away from Fame it was amazing that he came up to me and was so warm and inviting me told me relax take it easy it's gonna be all right you know he really gave me something that really if it wasn't for Jesse I don't think I would have got through the screen test and I think from then on throughout the performance Jesse and I bonded in that way the next thing that happened was very interesting I got through the screen test I went home big lobe came off my shoulders that I finished the original screenplay the original screen test the original competition I went home and three or four days passed by and I didn't hear anything from anybody and I began to get a little depressed because I knew and I felt the emotions that day in the prison in the screen-test prison I knew that it was there I knew that Michael had arrived but I didn't hear anything from the director about five days later I got a call with some Taylor Hackford I have to tell you something Damien we have a big problem and I thought to myself oh no there goes that part he said no wait I want to tell you you did a great job you did a great screen test like 85% of the footage from the screen test has been mistakenly destroyed a part of me was destroyed at that moment because I put all this effort all these years all these emotions everything into the screen test to play meat glue and blood in blood out and here was the director calling me to tell me that my screen test was destroyed I couldn't do anything but ask him what are we gonna do about and he told me he said we need to screen test again so out of all the other actors I was the only one who had the screen testing yet because for some reason my footage was destroyed maybe it was an accident could well bend I went back in I did my role I was very nervous my brother had passed nearly after that it was dying of cancer I was really going through a lot back then my brother Rico whom I loved and dedicate all this – well it it was a very difficult time because I got to the tough time in the first competition but my brother was failing them so when I went in I I was a bit disheveled and I did not do nearly as good as I did in the first reading or a screen test I didn't do as good and on the second screen test as I did the first one for many reasons but Taylor called me up and he said hey we'll get back to all the actors in a weekend we'll let you know good job you did better on the first one when he said hey we found a way to save the footage that was inside the prison the greatest screen test I did was inside the prison I was so relieved so they were going to intercut the new screen test with the original footage decide that it was great test for myself and my family where I asked them to be a part of that one day and that screen test was the most important for me because I remember feeling the emotions a week later I got a call Taylor Hackford said we go can you come meet me and I said Nico he's calling me Mitra I said of course so he said come meet me he gave me an address to a very famous restaurant in Hollywood I'm no rules at the time I had not met Jimmy vodka but I walked in and I saw a very very intense brilliant man named Jimmy buck is sitting there and Jimmy was very very similar to the role he played above him that I very controlled very emotional very brilliant and very very understanding that very intuitive man i sat down in front of Jimmy began to question me about my childhood questioning me about my Chicano rules questioned me about the experience I had with certain members of my family that had been in organized crime and so on and so on at least that's what the papers say but the thing is when I shared my expenses with Jimmy we bonded very much so and I saw the tailor who many people have to understand Taylor it's not a Chicano Taylor has no Latino in them at all Taylor isn't about it as white as they get and a very brilliant man and I think it was interesting because here was a director who's doing a film on the Chicano experience who had no idea what it was like to be a Chicano he might have had friends he might have had experiences but he could not feel the same that we did and even me being a whether because we all understand what it feels like the little idiosyncrasies but Taylor had a great understanding a great instinct and intuitive there's for this story and I think it's probably better than it was told by him as he could get an outside perspective of our community and I've seen many many films that are done by that they know filmmakers that were wonderful but I think in this experience it was very nice the outside view the outside perspective of the director to take the Chicano experience and express it and as an artist he did a great job with it but Jimmy and I bonded we came together on it and we all three knew that night the reality the next step was methodical directing Taylor Hackford took Jesse for Abel Benjamin Bratt who played popcorn Jesse played Cruz and myself who played meatloaf Damon Chopra he took all three of us and put us in East Los Angeles and actually made us live inside right beside the eye of the storm and at the time there were many shootings everywhere I mean I don't think there was a two nights that went by that I didn't hear a shot go off where I was living he put us in Boyle Heights and he put us in a wonderful family we lived with them the first thing I saw was a guy and I was one of the only guys inside them with this particular small group that had any real street experience so I understood it a bit more but I think Jessie and Ben were very courageous to go there and to live for three months with me to experience the street life to understand this part of the Chicano culture and many other parts of the Chicano community which were wonderful and had nothing to do with with this gangster experience there's so many hard-working wonderful law-abiding citizens in Latino in the Latino community I mean many many much more than ten gangsters so however it's like any group of people who come and try to immerse themselves into a society like the Irish did the Irish did it when they came to America and they had gains and you know they emerged and became great citizens the Italians didn't think many games became great citizens for the most part it happens to many many groups of people to come in and try to fit it into a society that's not theirs so it's nothing unusual that this happened in the mexican-american community so we went into this community and we started living and one thing led to another and Jesse became the artist he became clues of course Jessica's a real artist in his own right but he you could see day after day he was becoming clues every element then reward every walked every touch every dance Jesse became Cruz and would shine in his clues in every element and I wasn't a method actor but the part of the method that I was in this case was becoming part of the community for a role that was extremely gigantic I mean you're talking about a thirty five million dollar film a hundred and eighty page script originally you know die along after dialogue understanding the community in all of it we all came together we lived together we had dangerous times over there's a time when jesting bad and I think there was bend and went down to a picnic and there was a kid that was shot right here and he came back and he was emotionalism you know it was not a very easy thing to deal with these are real people and real guns him really really people were you know it was it was the real thing and but you know we you know we had courage we encouraged and we walked through it and we really lived it I think I had a more of experience of living him because what happened was all of us got together I became me glow I lived me globe Jesse lived as Cruz and Ben lived as Papa why me we by the time we started filming this I think Taylor Hackford knew that we were ready to experience these roles not to play them but to experience them and that's what I did I experienced this young me Clos growing up trying to fit in doing what everything to do and that great scene on top of the hilltop where spider gets shot and all these emotions is probably one of the my favorite scenes in the movie I think Taylor Negron did it such a genius jargon and letting us experience what it was like to be a team that Chicano team fighting ourselves and going up against ourselves and different gangs within the city and here I was I was trying to be good and trying to do the straight thing but I wanted to be with my cousin's so I found myself in a position where here I was next thing you know I got a gun and I got to shoot somebody because he's shooting my cousin's so the machismo test was there the test of courage was put in front of me close and it changed his life for me the journey wasn't over in East LA for my character and for me as an accurate I had to continue on we shot many many weeks in East LA and many emotions and scenes and wonderful times together all of us the crew all the actors but then it came a time for us to say goodbye temporarily and for me to pack up and get ready to go to some fancy school to send Clinton this place is a very very unique place a lot of hopelessness people doing 5 10 20 50 life in prison this was a very very very dark place in Clinton but yet as an actor and as a person I learned so much inside these prison walls these prison walls were filled with people who had character who had unique each one of them individual even though they were in a prison they still had a life it was a life inside of a light inside of a life inside of a prison wall the prison life is so different than the outside life it's its own community in its own right its own world and in that world you had to learn what those rules and regulations of that world were or you could get killed this was not a serious thing for some people as most of the people had to come in go out a day later but I was there every day living amongst these people so I had to become a part of this prison I'd become a part of its terms a part of understanding who and what it was like to become a lifelong prisoner in st. Quentin and I found it very interesting and very realistic that Taylor Hackford chose for us to really shoot inside the prison with real prisoners and I think that this is what made the movie so authentic many of us had experienced I had experienced prison most of the people had an experience that were after some did but the people that were in this prison were so helpful and so delighted to be a part of it because here they were in a life that was very mundane and here all this big Hollywood crook to make a movie about their culture in about their life so they were so helpful and so alive and and I think we gave some color to their lives and I think that made me very happy to be a part of that to not only be a part of one of the best movies I think that's been made in Hollywood and so fortunate to be in partners not because of me because of such a wonderful director and other wonderful actors and I think that yes I was a part of that I was blessed to be a part of it but without each and every intricate part of this movie it would never have been what it is and this is why there are people that and this is why there are people that throughout the world that understand me close character understand what I'm without I remember getting off a train in Bulgaria one time and some Bulgarian came they didn't speak a word English but he understood the English words from blood in blood out and he started spooling them off one by one must have said about 20 lives to me from blood and without of course about those locals forever it was one of them so you know this world had the world that has an understanding of what does film is I mean this isn't a Chicano this is the Chicano experience that has been experienced by so many people outside of America I mean there are Swedish people that come up with me Germans Italian French Japanese it was a big film in Japan and it's kind of a film that is more of an experience than it is a movie it's an experience it's almost like when you put those virtual goggles on if you watch a virtual experience I think that's what Taylor after did he gave us almost a virtual experience of being in Chicago prison life the emotions of the Latino Chicano community I think did they only make he almost made it virtual one of the things I found fascinating about blood and without and one of the most understated things in publicity afterwards was the brilliant genius work of Adam Hernandez he was the person who painted the mural at the end of the movie who did all of Jesse for those paintings I think that this man's work is so amazing and such a part of blood in blood out I mean there are times when you could look at one mural at a diner – painted and you can relive and experience the entire Chicano experience the entire blood and blood I've experienced and one of these paintings it's fascinating how this man enriches his art his paintings with such colors the colors of our community the blues and the greens and the yellows and and you know the the colors that we are so enriched with in the Chicano community I think that an honor nada is really really was one of the souls and there were many major souls in this that created this amazing film that was such a great life's experience of course chippy Baca was his vocabulary in the dialogue and the prison of dialogue on the streets without Jimmy Baca this film could never been what it is and without Don Hernandez this would never been the experience that we all experienced from going in without when I look at at Don's paintings I see and feel sundar personally blood in blood out as I said is a worldwide experience I'm so as I say over and over again blessed to be a part of this historical film you know this film was originally five hours long I'll never forget the first cut of it Taylor Hackford brought me and he wanted me to screen it with him I was very flattered that you'd want and after that come and see it and a few of us went to go see it and it was five hours of something long and I tell you I saw the greatness to his working but he took me afterwards after we watched the fire couldn't took we know families a lot of doors it's what do you think and I was of course flattered that he wanted to know my feelings I was just a young actor although there were many times he embraced my emotions and thoughts and artistic endeavor and during certain scenes that I thought looking back on it being a director now how smart that was to listen to your actors and to gain from your actors and your artists which is what he did he was smart enough to do that and I told him pretty blank it's too long and I had to be regal I had to tell him you have to stay more in the prison because that prison was originally like a subpart of movie Nico was a subpart I was the fourth lead in the movie I was for sure not the lead character in the original screenplay I was happy to have the fourth lead but what happened is it generated into this more of the prison feeling of the movie because the five hour version a lot of it was on the streets and with some of the other characters and what I think he did is he intertwined everything that didn't stayed in the prison war which I think was fascinating and probably why the film was sold worldwide went out he cut it down to three hours and 20 minutes long and what I think was most brilliant editing jobs and directing jobs my lifetime as a filmmaker and active it I've seen I think he did such a fascinating job there I did this personal documentary of what it was like to play meatloaf because I've had such a long career but never ends anything stuck with me like about to the locals forever or the fans we blend without the fans from blood and without for the greatest fans that any actor could ever wish for his dreams I mean we've even heard things like were up there with with films like Scarface and and boys in the hood all these other wonderful films and I thought were great and when you hear things like this from fans you say to yourself we must have been really part of something that gave some color to people's lives cases understanding in people's lives and like I said place about Germany Italy and France and Sweden places like Japan you know China even and people come up to you and they want to know what it was like to play meatloaf you know you did something there were a part of something that is really wonderful I mean I was just a small part in such a big part of a major event that happened in blood but I now soon blessed to be a part of it I think that what happened was in this film is it became a household name of the Chicano community of course but it spread its wings and crossed over to all cultures because of one thing it was about family there was about a media and every culture understands familia every culture understands pain suffering loss and this was the genius that Jaime Bachman incorporated into the script this was the brilliance that Taylor Hackford brought together into one big film about the Chicano experience that the whole world I hear that they even played blended without in some schools to give people an understanding of it these fell they experienced there are some gang members that are being told to watch this within the community social communities to teach them what it's going to be like if you go this life and that is such a problem filling on my part to be part of a movie that people can learn from I mean if you do one movie like that in your lifetime you can consider yourself a very lucky person I think it's time now for me to give what I originally wanted to give my fans in this personal documentary meet below what it was like to play me flowing blood ends it out and hand it over to my fans and ask them certain questions that they want to know about blooded without and to give them some deeper insight into it so here we have some questions so the first question is Jimmy Martinez Jimmy wants to know do they still call you milkweed or meatloaf and the answer to that question is for sure yes I don't think there's a week or a day that goes by that when I'm in a Hispanic community that I don't get someone coming up to me and saying Milly Nick Lowe I don't think I get called my real name as an actor many times in this community it's always meet low or wetter or milkweed so yes the answer is yes why Garcia asks what did you take in from the movies opinion and I answer her this I told it so much in from this movie as I said before it was the Chicano experience for me also you know I had subtle parts of that growing up like I said but this was such an amazing part a big dose of the culture that I embraced and loved so much I was able to live in this movie the music the dancing of fool the good times the bad times the darkness the light of the Chicano community I was able to experience and I took in so much and so thankful for Eduardo Gonzalez asked to taco and Cruz and meat glue do they still hang out well I of course have seen both of these wonderful actors after the wonderful blood and without experience not as much as I play but I don't think there would ever be a time in our lives that Jesse well Ben and I are many of the other cast would come up to each other and see each other and not relive that experience we lived over 20 years ago because it's such a vast and such an intense experience we lived together that there's no way that I could see Jesse without growing up and giving him in Brussels and say hey man you okay you know it was it was a great feeling for all of us we were young artists young Chicano artists some of us not Chicano some of us like Ben's Peruvian but all that Tino artists and we all grew up together like this and were able to express the Chicano spirit ease together as artists I don't think there's ever a time in my life I will ever have an experience like this and I must say that one of the greatest actors in the movie was in the Vickie Castillo Castillo one of my favorite actors he played Montana without his wonderful theater experience emotions I could have never been able to express myself in this endeavor of London without playing Vito he gave me so much so much emotion as a man as a friend as a person as an actor that without Montana's character I don't think this ever could have been with it and now Burt though or thing I asked why don't we do blood and without – that's a very good question on their toll I must say to you this that I am NOT controlled I'm not in control of any of the elements of the film I was merely an accurate back then it's such a long ago journey for me however Disney and Taylor Hackford are the ones that had the rights to do the film I think it'd be a great experience to do a follow up of London but I want Michael gets out of jail what experience he would have what experience Ben would have pop-goes character you just see all these other wonderful characters in the movie I think that it's a matter of politics and a matter of finance that's the only thing I can think of I mean you must understand this movie came out during the riots let him get out came out of during a time when people were testing the waters Disney was testing the waters with these types of films and they didn't get a very good reaction a lot of groups were saying no to Disney why are you doing this why you doing this gangster movie they're supposed to be Disney and you know they kind of pulled back the reins so when the movie came out it was a great success in the theaters on til the riots happen right during the movie release and there's a bunch of fighting in the theaters different gangs and this and that so they pulled the plug on it which caused it to be a financial doom I think in the early years of course later on two years later it was a very sad thing for us during those two years but because none of us got a chance to you know get our careers off the money because nobody saw the film they pulled it but then back then they had VHS and they on VHS and the next thing you know it became this cult film so it gave me the new life it became what it is today which is a film uh that people know all over the world and it became what it should be but to do another when it's the right time it's the right time to see the maturity of the characters and where they go and I'd be the first one to say it's time to get out of prison eat low sandy Trevino asks how much of myself I brought to the character well like I said you know I grew up with gangsters I understood them well I knew the language and of the feeling I knew the post the posture the the way the movement the dialogue so I understood it early I read a lot of that to the character and was able to express what I had seen growing up through me Randal Philly would like to know what it was like from going to this good kid to the leader of the Mexican Mafia in the movie what it was like to experience that well as an actor I don't think you could dream of writing a role so wonderful for an actor's expression you start out as a young lion and I glow and then he goes and starts trying to become part of the prison a part of that journey and then gets out and becomes more mature and more strong and more dark as a character I mean there's a point in time in the movie but meet little rolls over in the prison and you know you can see a look in his eyes that he's lost everything there is nothing else to live for except one of them I think that was the thing I was able to bring to and I think that's such a great transition mold as a man as an actor to play this young lead role in this getting more mature meet little tuber stomach old rolando GS what it was like to work inside of San Quentin prisoners well like I said before it was a great experience because I get a chance as an actor to fulfill this role in the real way in a realistic way and there were many many moments that I remember to this day in the prison I remember there's a time there was a I won't mention his name where there was a murderer he'd been in for 20 years and he was just a young guy but he had shot some people when he was quite young and he was in his mid-30s till her maybe 40s but still a relatively young guy and we were shooting and all the crew was there and security guards everything and next thing you know people started trickling out to go to lunch and one thing led to another and I was laying in the real prison cots to get some rest sometimes because I was on the set so much I don't want to go out to my camper can you imagine running out to your high-end Hollywood camper and all these prisoners looking at you I mean yeah it take Ella for it and I did so I said hey I'm gonna stay in here and I'm gonna become like them while I'm doing this part to honor them and to honor my role so I would spend a lot of time inside the prison next thing you know I found myself alone in the car and I came out and there was nobody there no guards because you know they had rifles and guns protecting us from real prisoners next thing another was just me and I won't mention his name but a very very intense Chicana and a real thing I looked up at him he looked at me we were all alone it was amazing and I know he was in for murder and I looked at in the only thing I think it was want to take a picture why need to L ask did you feel very much Eastman playing the role of meepo well that's an interesting question because I think the whole machismo feeling from all the machismo emotions that came through to me glue and many of the other characters I mean back then there was not such a politically correct world like we live in today I mean I was able to express me club as this very much she's small guy which he was you know and I as a man who was able to express my chief small as it can only be seen in the Latino community is this fire his emotions and not all Latinos are like that but it's a prevalent part of our tribal community as part of our survival this machismo that isn't part of our community and anybody doesn't think it's there and anybody doesn't want it there means they want to take away something that's existed for eternity in our community and cannot be taken away and I and many actors were allowed to express this machismo in these characters and as men young men with virile composition and able to do it through characters like meat loaf taco and Cruz you know of course Cruz was more of an artist but you know still we were all real men growing and trying to survive in this community as characters and as young artists in this community we're all fighting for survival in one way or another so yes it was very much useful and I'm not afraid to say that I really embraced that part of it I embraced that part of week load that machismo part of me clothes as much as I embraced it in myself today is a whole different world you know being the machismo was almost like a no-no and politically correct you know a political correct person would think we were dinosaurs you know I don't think it's true you know I mean today I mean today being mighty small is a very politically incorrect thing to do but it's still part of the Chicano community you know they're trying to take it out you know take away things that are within our community in a Latino Hispanic community you know and even people within the Hispanic community are trying to take away things that have been with us for centuries and millennia whether it be from some sport or whatever machismo element that's a part of our society and I think it's a horrible thing to try to do I mean we don't try to go take away certain elements of other people's culture it should not be taken away from my culture my Chiefs know is a part of our culture it's a part of the tribal community the indigenous community that we all are a part of in our blood whether we be a weather like myself was only half Mexican or a full-blooded Mexican but we all have indigenous blood in us so we have a tribal community that resonates to this much useful and the survival of it Hector GS what was it like to experience and music imploded without well if you remember the movie Rocky little Conte the Academy Award winner for that movie did the music for blood without and I think that music was such a great aspect of sounded for summer and let him put out I think without those emotions that he bought with the flutes and indigenous roots and all the strings I mean really would have an amazing John I think Taylor Hackford did a great job of choosing him for this part and of course he produced all the music for this and Taylor did a great job of the music I mean without the music it would have been a great movie but not nearly as emotional as it was I just love the music was about as many others do the music the dance the food that tastes the sounds the feelings of the Chicano community that I was able to experience during this film bloody but I have never left me and never will they're part of me they're part of me though they're part of Damian Chaplin they're part of all of us who can experience this wonderful moving blood and without and I am so proud I was a part of it that I got to play meet though I'm so glad that I'm able to give a little bit if I did of in-depth understanding of what it was like to play meet globe and what it was like to get the part ones like to express the part I hope I was able to do that in this very personal documentary and I must say that the words will live on from blood and without the characters will live on the music will live on the art of a download on this will live on forever in this movie and the only way I could say goodbye to you is to tell you this but those locals forever you

Shooting The War: Episode 2 (WW2 Documentary) | History Documentary | Reel Truth History



Series looking at how the Second World War was documented by German and British home movie makers.

This programme is about the experience of children during the war, seen through the films of them shot by parents, friends and teachers. The films, and the recollections of the children in them, capture the initial novelty of war, but also the later reality of death and loss.

In Britain, filmmakers were on hand to witness the first event of war, evacuation. Eric Powell, a young cine enthusiast from Wiltshire, filmed the arrival of Marion, a girl from London, as she became part of his family. The recollections bring the reality of the transformation of children’s lives to the viewer.

Film shot by the head of Elworth School in Cheshire is recalled by teacher Veronica Kirk and pupil John Owen. The film shows the way the school adapted to war – the school garden turned over to vegetables, children conducting first aid, air raid shelter practice and reality of air attack.

It was much the same in Germany and those looking back on their childhood recall the impact of Hitler on them, the changes at school and at home, the terror of the Jewish school child and the sorrow of the children at the end of the war, living in destitution as their parents were forced to sell toys for bread.

Rainer and Wolfgang Fritz grew up in Stuttgart and remember how their father filmed the building of the community air raid shelter. He filmed his family through the war and was on hand, with the camera, when the family house was destroyed by bombing in 1944.

Life for Jewish child Inge Deutschkron was even worse. She grew up in Berlin and attended the Jewish school in the city. Most of her classmates died in concentration camps, but she stayed in Berlin, in hiding, and survived.

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Welcome to Reel Truth History, the home of gripping and powerful documentaries. Here you can watch both full length documentaries and series that explore some of the most comprehensive pieces of world history.

#ReelTruth #History #WorldWarTwo

BURNING MAN DOCUMENTARY TRAILER – A BURNING DREAM



WATCH THE MOVIE @

NEW TRAILER

TEASER 1-

TEASER 2 –

A film by Massimiliano Davoli, Dario Jurilli, Giorgio Galli
currently in post production – coming soon

[Applause] no one could describe with what Burning Man is because it's something different for everyone it's kind of like arriving about another planets right there's not anywhere on the planet anything this big I want you know what if you dream well you're looking for where's your perfect world this yeah we're trying to explain to someone what this is about to be returned to it you can't Fanning them ya know the heavies think Oh gift economy even bring about it with you everyone excuse me for a lot of people it's the one week when they can really be who they want to be captain just big yeah you look great is this you in real life the person that you are right now the one of the better parties ABC's the best [Applause] a fusion of psychedelics countercultural with the emergence of new technologies and abacus tribalism this here's do whatever you want here I mean shopping then maybe the perfect world I felt that many times and had some of the most profound influence I've ever had it's an inspiration that I feel affects the world in a positive way you come here and you leave very effective confident to take that view into your everyday life

Documentary on the communities that harvest red hash in Lebanon | Heart Of Sky | 4:3 Short Film



Playing in the minimal spaces between documentary and fiction, Heart of Sky is a moving portrait of the farming communities that cultivate and harvest Lebanese Red hashish in the Bekaa valley, between the mountains of eastern Lebanon.

Soundtracked by Damian Lazarus & The Ancient Moons, the film is a blend of raw intimacy and cinematic transcendence paints a profound and elevated picture of the beating hearts and tender hands that work the fields of the illegal industry. The film points a lens that is at the same time acute and spectral, revealing glimpses of the realities behind the curtain of smoke.

Despite difficult working conditions and an existence that seems suspended between the valley and the sky, the people of the village live, love and labour with humble gratitude for the gifts of the earth, and with faith in God and in each other.

► Director Jessy Moussallem was given free rein to work with the music of Damian Lazarus & The Ancient Moons, using sounds and samples. The film features numerous tracks from their new album ‘Heart of Sky’.

► Watch more 4:3 –

El General Trailer . Documentary Film – POV on PBS



A documentary film by Natalia Almada.

Airing on July 20, 2010 at 10pm, POV on PBS (Check your local listings).

Watch online: July 21 through September 4, 2010.
Past and present collide as award-winning filmmaker Natalia Almada (Al Otro Lado, POV 2006) brings to life audio recordings she inherited from her grandmother, daughter of Plutarco Elias Calles, a revolutionary general who became Mexicos president in 1924. In his time, Calles was called El Jefe Maximo (Foremost Chief). Today he is remembered as El Quema-Curas (Priest Burner) and as a dictator who ruled through puppet presidents until his exile in 1936. Airing during the centennial of the Mexican Revolution, El General moves between a daughters memories of her father as she grapples with historys portrayal of him and the weight of that same mans legacy on Mexico today. Winner of the 2009 Sundance Film Festival U.S. Directing Award: Documentary. A co-production of ITVS in association with Latino Public Broadcasting.

Joe David: Spirit of the Mask (Full Documentary) © 1982



Working within the Native-American tradition of the Canadian Northwest, Joe David has become one of the strong contemporary links in the preservation and reinvention of the art of the northwestern Pacific coast’s indigenous population. This program follows David’s creative process, from carving and finishing a magnificent wolf headdress from a block of cedar to its ultimate use as a ceremonial mask worn by the artist himself in a haunting dance that concludes the videotape.

Kensington Communications creates and produces exceptional, award-winning television and interactive media. From high-profile television events to moving personal stories, from ground-breaking science to performing arts and innovative online experiences, our diverse productions share a commitment to imagination, intelligence and passion. Purchase titles from our catalogue at

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there was a time when some people thought that the culture and art of the Northwest Coast was dead but a few people practiced it and kept it alive and never died for some of us this isn't a tribute to the past but a tribute to a living culture it is impossible to separate the objects from the environment in which they were created the great forests the abundant life of the streams to see the magic and stillness of the Northwest Coast the people of this coast proudly erected totem poles for all to see for the generations to come they were monuments to their lineage to the great supernatural worlds of Raven Thunderbirds and killer whales their languages and songs were rich and complex their masks and dances were treasured as an artist working in the traditional forms of the northwest coast I spent a lot of time in museums looking at the old pieces wondering about them and learning from them I have this fascination with things haven't survived hundreds of years having survived time I'm as closely connected with the thousands of years in the past as I am to my living present I was closely conscious and connected and dedicated to the past as I am to the future my people were known as Nootka among us were many singers dancers carvers weavers and storytellers I believe that the spirit of these people is alive in me the same blood that ran through them hundreds of years ago is running through me right now I try to get the general shape as soon as possible so that I can so I can follow most of it often to be lighter not layer in the handle can turn around right now it's pretty pretty heavy moisture I was born in clack with sound I was born in a village called hoop it's it the closest translation to a pitch at his resting place of the moon I was one of the younger of a large family that was raised in a house built by my father my older brothers and sisters would take care of us younger ones when our parents were up the coast hunting or fishing the important event in the lies of the village children was being sent away to the mission boarding schools all the native children of my generation went to those schools I remember going there at eight years old at first I didn't like it there I didn't like the school and I didn't want to be there it was totally unfamiliar to me but once I found brothers cousins and other kids my own age that were similar to me I came to realize that there were things there that fascinated me it was a much bigger and greater world and I'd realized it was much more than the Julie just much more than the tides and the seasonal run of the salmon deer or berries it was a whole new world for me I remember there was very little time to be alone and I needed a place to go a place apart from the others it was then that I discovered a chapel and it became a special place for me I would find myself seeking it out because it was always calm it was quiet it was always safe and it was always beautiful when I first saw the altar I thought someone has created it someone has carved and painted it because that was my world my father was a carver and painter people in my village was always creating as a child I remember my reverence was for the artwork in that Chapel and its effect on the room and everyone in it just as I had seen my cultures art have a similar effect on the people that of on respect after three years at the school when I was 11 my family moved away from the village and traveled across the western states as migrant farm workers in my teens I got a scholarship to attend art school it was only as I became older and realized how important my own culture was to me that I dedicated myself to the art of my people it was then that my father gave me my adult Indian name apologies I spend as much time as I can on this island it is only recently that I've rediscovered how important this environment is to my work how it influences me I've learned to recognize the powers of nature as being the same as that of all creativity and I try to express that through my carvings I'm now making a wolf headdress that represents my Indian name I want the life and spirit of both forest and ocean to come through I came into this world to be an artist and that's why I'm an artist I didn't it just didn't come along the way and I said okay I can do it easily I think I meant to be that way all along I'm not doing all this to survive even though I make things in it and they're accepted and people pay a lot of money for all that but I'm not doing it to survive I do it for pure joy I do it for the love of it I do I carve wood for the love of wood it's not just a piece of cedar I love it I love the tools I love every shape every color of wood every grain movement a lot of people in Vancouver and Seattle commissioned work for their private collections as do museums my friend Norman Tate's carving a welcome figure whose every to next time I'll be doing it'll be a woman figure a mate to this one that's been do it bowl answer but I like this blue thing under the same thing self-portrait that at your anishka smile meant to touch this socket strong my decision to do through this wolf comes from the beauty and grace of the wolf dance so carving at a keep in mind what I want to what movements I want to emphasize what movements I'm going to use are the Wolves the anger I'll be coming out taking its body taking it's taking us life and turn it into a dance throughout history it's the are correct that survives they can you can talk and talk and talk and talk about Tutankhamun and Michelangelo and all the Pope and all the politics and all the goddamn wars but you stand in front of that thing and you look at it and someone made it hundreds of years ago you think of the man that did it the man I did it and what it meant to him to execute it what it meant to do them what these people meant him what he's tiny meant him and what he's personal contribution meant to him and that's what drives me to do it to me to do this mask or to do this dance or to do this whatever it is is that I known from looking at the fire from the past that they knew that they knew what they what it meant to do that that's why it was so monumental they wanted their great-great-great grandchildren to know what they stood for and then to be able to relay it to the other people to the rest of the tribes this is my family this is what we know this is what we look like this is what we stand for

Transmen Documentary Part 3



WARNING: DO NOT BIND WITH ACE BANDAGES

Part 3 of the documentary “Transmen.” See more at

This documentary is not for sale. © Tiffany Gibson, 2011

I am kiss leave Brendan James page on 22 and I live and bring one in Nashville Tennessee and I'm a licensed massage therapist and I'm transgender female to male I was born a female in Clarksville Tennessee Montgomery City Hospital – Monroe and Suzy Paige I always knew that I was more boyish whenever I was younger I was wore my hair up and a hat Chicago Bulls is my favorite team I was a ran around with my brother I'd always try and I guess dressed more like him and his friends and different things like that I had a lot of guy friends growing up it was always a lot more macho I guess and I could pretty much beat up and he got I hung out with I was very naive I would say it's a child about different things my family was very loving but maybe not very open so they didn't really talk about worldly worldly things and stuff like that so everyone just kind of made me seem like I was a normal even though they'll behind my back or to the side they would all make comments or be concerned about the way that I was I just really kind of teetered on a really big line on being who I really felt like I was you know and then who I was portrayed to be evil my family I mean if I could have understood that I was trans then and transitioned at 13 then I would have done it for sure like if I would have had a doctor or someone realized and sit me down and tell me exactly what it entitled then I would have been more than happy to do it I know that I definitely would have not gotten the support for my family what he has learned I first met he was Kayla her she was Caitlyn but we did hit it off I mean we pretty much texted um for like two days probably and we just decided to go ahead until I like each other everything about there was to me about the other one or anything that usually hide I guess was someone that you like and if we still wanted to meet with each other he was going to come down and visit me for the whole day so he did and everything went really good so so we used to get spark we went out there and there's like this cliff area and on the rock he had a road marry me I didn't see it I think I just said on it but whatever I turned around he was on one knee we were supposed to have thousand our wedding and then like they come late for the wedding he was like rat doing vows after I stressed over writing vows what our next way do you want we can use them for the next one I want to write Alan we can use those though I got those four minutes for my shirt just think I was watching them at church I thought you said you wrote them all from your own opinion I did with the church with health I'm hoping that we do get the rights as the married couples do whenever we're able to officially get married like I want my old same to change I don't want it to change because I went to court and made them change me like I just want everything to happen as it would as if I was straight ahead of this proportion like we are I had never personally ever really encountered anyone that was transgender and all I'd seen and had been from like TV tabloids you know different things like that and I had a really negative view on it we were just hanging out our bed talking and having like one of those little couple talks you just talk about random things and I think I asked him if he liked how the choice to be a woman or man which he would rather choose and he went with Amina and I knew that it was possible just transition and become like the opposite sex but I didn't really know what all that entailed and I'm not entirely sure if at the time I said it if I really really like him it's it but I put it out there on the table and he got really offended by it I was definitely very upset at first with her you know bringing that up but the more that we talked about it and the more that we researched and just kind of let it seep in the more than we learned about it I fit a lot of the criterias I found a therapist to go to you and we found a support curve through the the tea palace and went to a doctor in hey did you say your doctor was said it then I would be a really good candidate to start hormones and so we went ahead and started normal and scented taking my Shawna testosterone today today is going to be the first day that I start taking half the dosage sometimes it doesn't always work the first time but we hope that it does get it just right and then it will bleed a lot and sometimes I'm gonna bleed at all that's how I do my shots what most people are looking for when they come to see me is hormone therapy if it's a female-to-male transition then we typically use in testosterone injections and I needed to be familiar with those things as well as the potential side effects and complications and I spend to get a bit of time educating patients on that to make sure that they kind of know what they're getting into and some of these medications create irreversible effects and so that's another thing people need to be aware of once you have hair growth for example and if you start treating any biological female with testosterone and she develops you know hair growth in a beard pattern for example that's not going to go away if you stop treating I don't know or I'm not on T yet because I have been doing my own research on it and I'm currently looking into some alternate some alternate methods times are getting tough of course you know works kind of not giving me the other time I was so right now it's getting tough to get you know like my natural testosterone things I've been about a week or so down which is kind of really a big setback for me and kind of downer but I like to I'm hoping to pick up you know the next day or two right where I left off and continue on also hoping you know eventually I can get international orchids start looking at physicians in Nashville to actually get a physician to do hormone therapy for me money is a very big factor the many trans people can't even get health insurance because they're trans very few companies will even cover trans people and some of the ones that do don't want to cover transgender healthcare especially because it relates to the transition outside of school I spend a lot of time in Nashville when I perform I do drag which I'm a male impersonator there's some people as his hand from my head and put hair on my face it's a good time sometimes glitter I'm a drag king which is defined as usually a biologically born female who dresses who portrays a man on stage and joy queen is about usually a biologically born female a male who performs as female dry kings are not as popular as drag queens enjoy what I do very much [Applause] drug families basically are like a drag king will have will take on new drag kings as their son and will be like their mentor like and also drag queens take on drag son and daughters basically someone with more experience picks up someone with less experience and then when the person people have less experience go on they pick up someone else or less experienced so we have these elaborate drag families like right now I think my drag family including Anthony and me and my other son they we have like 26 family members it's a fun thing to do I mean you get up in front of a bunch of people and you know just be goofy pretty much I mean you get to do something that you don't get to do it in everyday life I think that several performers out there are told that they can't they can't perform because they've had work done they you know they've had cert they've had bottom surgery like Amanda females mainly like drag queens say that they are drag queen and then they're they're trans also and they've had surgery and they may be excluded from some passenger systems because they've had these surgeries never been I've never been told that I can't continue performing Trane's but in my community of drag performers everyone understands that I'm transmitted that I you know I'm James day in and day out onstage and offstage people who are in drag people who are transitioning and those are the ones who are most easier to easiest to target by police the first don't want riots the Stonewall riots were started by transgender people the original it was easiest to arrest trans people because of the visibility because they look different what's happened is what we sometimes refer to as whitewashing riding a group out of the history african-americans have been written out in different ways and that's where the term whitewashing comes from and trans people have been written out of the story of Stonewall the very people who started the riots it's really not until the 90s and and especially as we move into the 21st century that the trans community has really started to catch up to the other communities

Japanese journalist makes documentary on WWII sex slaves



A documentary about WWII sex slaves titled, “Living with the Memory,” is set to be released in Japan this July. Produced by a leading Japanese freelance journalist, the documentary is about the Japanese army’s use of wartime sex slaves, or “comfort women.”

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MY TRUTH REVEALED | A KEESHA ANDERSON DOCUMENTARY: PART 3



DIRECTORS:
Jahi Gilkey @YUNG_GILK
Darlene Desmangles @LENEBEAN_

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I want them to know that I've done with it took to take them from a lot of things that I've experienced a lot of the lessons that I've learned and try to raise them to be god-fearing individuals humble individual young ladies and to just understand that everybody has their own journey so do not be judgmental I want them to see me as someone who is strong and someone who overcame a lot primitive to even be here and a lot for them to be where they will be years from now there's a lot that goes on behind the scenes of being a mom in general but still have a life and to raise kids is a different type of responsibility that I don't think you ever really understand it to become a parent and I really want them to grow up understanding and a love for me for that sacrifice there's nothing I hate greater when it's time into my family I keep my girls right by my side like a family Johnny crawling to the sauna she's so fancy daddy came up first so she saw unlike her daddy my girls the world of making happy you said I'm a girl I can't wait till we can marry come for anything I'm running for best thing about it I can never repay you being a mom make me worry too much already I mean I feel like no matter where you go you're gonna have to always be careful your surroundings be careful everything that's going on but all the massive school shootings and anything that can happen but I just feel like the opportunities are a little bit more limited on the west side and I definitely won't want my daughters to be exposed to a lot more than I wasn't exposed to I feel like being on the north side or in the Midtown area of Atlanta I get to see a lot more I get to see more opportunities healthier stores but even when you overeat over here so much fast food is liquor corners every single where you turn I don't really see that where I'm in now and I don't really want my daughters to be exposed or overly exposed to stuff that they don't need to see to at a young age because right now we're in the age of social media a lot of kids aren't pression about a lot of people doing stuff things they don't have no business doing because it's readily available drugs and all that stuff it's readily available at kids fingertips over here on this side of town and I would just prefer for my kids to you know not have access to it as easily you just like I said you can't help who your kids go to school with the other stuff the joke that people may bring to your kids and stuff but you know I just know me personally with my experiences I saw too much as a child I saw too much of kids were a look to grown people are a little too fast and people had to grow up I saw kids having to be parents and adults today little siblings and stuff like that and you know me personally I just knew I had to have my mind right be a lot more street smart where I was and I couldn't really think like a child and be innocent as a child as much as I would like to be in us as a child on the west side of Atlanta and I just I want my daughters to have to experience nothing like I don't want them to have to be rushed into growing up and so don't hood I'm worried about things that they should have to worry about as a child just because of their environment just because they can't really control the other stuff that people may bring to them or bring to their attention and also the heavy judgment Joe is quisha I feel like sometimes I feel like I don't even know I like to shout out to my youtube channel like I feel like I want to be a great mother I want to be god-fearing as much as I possibly can I want to be a great daughter sister brand you know want to be a great businesswoman but when you actually look at it and break those things down and their own entities sometimes I feel like I fall short I think that overall I'm just me I'm just really seems like it's a complex answer because there's so many different facets of Who I am I've grown up and I don't so many different things so I can't just say you know one or two words to describe Who I am I just feel like you got to really hear my story to understand who I am I don't feel like there's just like words that could you know summarize Who I am as a person I just feel like my story is who I am that really defines me I think for me my whole life was with women and at a pointed that I had to come to a reality that it was more so that I thought at first I was just been in the toxic relationship and that's the reason why things weren't working out once I started to reflect within myself I noticed that it was more than a toxic relationship with other people I was in a toxic relationship with my own self I wasn't living in my own truth and I didn't want to admit it so many people rely heavily on me for my platform so many people rely heavily on me for being proud of who I was or who I thought I was at the time and and that just wasn't a true reality for me and I I realized towards the end of my last relationship that I had to start living for me I had to do what made me happy I had to make decisions for myself and I moved forward with what I knew would make me ultimately happy and not worrying about what other people would think people have been studying me investigating me and just trying to frickin figure out every little bit in piece of my life which I definitely understand because I have been very open with you guys for the last how many years I've been when you're like 29 years I've been very very open with you guys about every single thing that goes on in my life so I understand how you guys can be curious about what's going on when things look a lot different and um all of that after I realized that I have to do this for myself and this is not this is not for my family my friends or my subscribers to come in and dictate how I deal with certain things that that make sense like he/she has to deal with those things and once Keyshia has dealt with those things Keyshia can be a happier stronger person and let her friends her family and now my subscribers helped me to deal with those things as well apparently you know that decision caused a lot of controversy you know Tia pays you probably traffic to your pay so do you think that it brought like a positive impact or overall how did it impact you know your career initially I thought that people would support me being true to who I was since for so long people already tried to cast me as you know a fake lesbian or you know this is just temporary or she doesn't really know this is just a phase so I thought when I came forward and said you know I think I do want to be with the guy I think this is the path that I want to go down people will embrace it and I think people just hopped on the bandwagon because it was different they saw me in one way for so long and people were so curious as to you know how it's keeps you're gonna be with the man like let's see how different she's gonna behave or let's see what kind of guys she's interested in not necessarily supporting me and uplifting me in my decision just more so judging me for being in my truth don't play with him me and quisha a week we first met in high school but you know you know I just hope it just means like y'all my best one thing I'm in Vegas right now likes you want to hang out when I got home I'm gonna do it but honestly I kind of like pain I came home I wasn't really trying to you know set it down no girl you know I just got home from school do it understand I wasn't gonna hang out a little but I she takes it again she like that don't don't play forever like she was serious about stuff I thought I liked it so fun and we hung out like the next the next day or whatever once I saw her and I got her I got in the caucus you gotta pick me up I just I was looking at and I was just there out here and literally he got back and the next day he came with me to get baptized so he was there hand in hand with me getting baptized just like that and that was just different for me we Casillas on your balls oh I know you ain't on the ball hog but instantly when I started talking to him I said Jeremy is so different like he was so funny and he was so charming like opening all doors filling up my gas tank for me picking me out like we could just laugh I could just be myself I didn't have to worry about anything like I was just me I was talking about how my ex never even wanted me to go out because I didn't smoke I didn't drink so they try to make me feel like I wasn't fun enough or you know my girl is lame and I used to hurt me a lot and he just like girl let's get on the next flight this is my first time in Miami if I didn't tell you guys and I was able to make a lot of first memories like jet skiing a lot of the restaurants a lot of the things that my girlfriend says it was just kind of like you know I we was together for you know a little minute but in you know we don't experience a lot of stuff together been through a lot of stuff together like a boyfriend and girlfriend wouldn't pay so I just felt like it was on the right for me to actually be my partner in it honestly to keep it real I feel like they're an excuse will kept me I drew me towards her more okay just like it's just like if you care about a person cuz like I mean I care to like it was cool way before we even kind of relationship so is I we care about a person you see it like I'm going through something you know my friend I just run away from me so I was like that kind of like you know saying gee we towards hurt more forever I know you can get in school and I just I was have a person she was and you know I just not I just couldn't definitely leave the situation ever had someone support me as heavily as Jeremy did people didn't even really see like I work really hard for what I do and people have sabotage me and my and my career when I've tried to help people people have manipulated me because they knew I was the easy target and Jeremy he came in and he was there he was present he when I handed out flyers for me for my hair company like different colleges and a hot Sun he promoted me like nothing before and people were so critical of him like you don't post on social media so you must not really like her but he was present in real life if it is day right most people get in the door and I you start where you live with people you really find out who they are I've never had never experienced and with nobody nobody that were kind of like woke me up and be able to say that you might be able to make it tomorrow man ok what red carpet are you talking about hey are you recording me right now you know I'm nice it happened so fast we weren't trying to get pregnant the first time and I was so excited when I got pregnant I always wanted to know like how would it feel being pregnant or you know like what's gonna happen you know I've always wanted to be a mom I just couldn't wait to even get the end of the birth so I could meet my baby so it was such a joy for me when I found out that we were pregnant my best friend came over we planned out this whole thing to show him and it was just so exciting and just as quickly as I found out we were having a child it's as quickly as the child was gone just that fast she took my blood and that's when the lady came in talking randomness and and like I said I don't remember how she told me but some kind of way she ended up telling me oh you miscarried and as far as me and Jeremy was concerned he was I just remember him feeling so bad for me I didn't want to accept it and and he had to accept the reality for the both of us it was it was it was it was kind of I felt like I had you know like be there for her emotionally to like did it kind of like a failure come on let's get it together like we're gonna be okay just not gonna kick like he's not gonna miss you can always you know have another kid I try for her the key you know is what God saw fit for right now you know we had a conversation and I said this is something you know that I really really want and I want to know if you feel the same way about me that I feel about you was having a family and settling down and he said yes and I knew that there was gonna be a light at the end of the tunnel so the depression that I thought I was about to be in from losing that child instantly went away once he told me that he knew that he wanted the spinor SS life he wanted me to be the mother of his kids and we could try again for another child when I became pregnant again it was definitely a lot more challenging than I thought it would be I thought it would be easy breezy I thought it would be like here's my rainbow baby you know we were finally pregnant again I'm so excited and instantly like reality hit me that I was pregnant and it was so much pressure on me that I felt like I shut down a lot in my relationship I felt like I shut down a lot from my friends and my family because a lot of them have never experienced a miscarriage and definitely definitely not a public miscarriage and it was hard for me to accept that I was pregnant again because I was still stuck in the miscarriage that I was at fear every single day constantly that I'll miss Carrie again it was it was those I was everything idea but I was nervous and I was I ain't know where my head can't really wrap around a lot of stuff but just this is my first time you know every corner for this type of situation you know especially being play-by-play you know I had to learn how to care for someone who tells the needs and emotions before most of the time we couldn't be sexual throughout our pregnancy I was terribly sick so I couldn't do absolutely anything I didn't really want to kiss I didn't even want him to touch me and we weren't used to that and I thought that well this is something we both wanted so we both knew it could come with being pregnant he thought well this is something we both wanted so you knew that this was something that could happen but you still have a role to me as well inside of challenges you know you never faced before you know I'm a man so it was just kind of like you know what about me no I'm I'm here I'm waiting to go every need you know but she sick all the time you know she business of my frustrations and and my team is that I fight you know a that was a perfect time I'm saying I was fucking okay that was the perfect time for them coming you know and just you know a man this do this do that after that conversation he pretty much assured me you know there was just lust and it will probably fade away but he loved me nonetheless and he doesn't regret you know deciding to have a family and you know we were gonna work things out we're gonna move through it it was okay and this is the same day as my best friend's bachelorette parties and we were at the condo where we were going to have the bachelorette party I did not plan it so I didn't know of the neighborhood or anything of that sort but once we got in our car we were sitting at the elevator I'm waiting to go up and he should had just called me and said that she was about to pull in finally she was on the way so we're kind of waiting on her as well but right before she pulled in I seen a car that looks very similar to Jeremy's keep in mind we're in a parking garage and for a neighborhood like if so its visitors and residents in this neighborhood I'm so I seen a car pulling it looks just like Jeremy's and he rolled right past us so I was able to see that it was in fact Jeremy I just understood my I just lit I just felt I felt and I live you know I let my inner demons take over Monday morning she text my phone and said you know I'm your best friend and I just want to let you know that I saw a female in Jeremy's car over the weekend I told her be he mentioned it was a girlfriend in the front seat and she was like no he said that was his homeboy girl or whatever and she went ahead and asked him about that and I guess he had other stories the backup why this girl was being in the front seat I mean you know I was just you know I was I was you know conversing you know with another another friend or whatever to get pregnant and for him to make a decision to get closer to another woman when I needed him most there's like a my I'm stuck here I can't I can't be you know set like satisfied you know men who selfish like were selfish beings you know so it was like I couldn't see past with the real objective was a situation was so you know I just you know I like I said I feel an area you know so that taught me you know a lot about myself and a lot of other things that I wanted life it was really hard seeing that she was like during pregnancy it's such a like critical moment not any stress and it hurts me so much that she was stressing out about this situation simply because like she was really going through it and he wasn't really there for her in this moment I was there for her like she confided in me she didn't talk to me like a situation because it is a embarrassing situation you can't really you don't over the trust in situations like this so because I had first on seen it and then we went through it together she was able to confide in me I didn't look at Jeremy the same for a while it's honest as he was every day you know he still kissed me and he still loved me you will bring me roses home and I knew that with his character but I just wanted to know how could he love me so deeply but be so out of reach with our relationship especially in such a joyous time I had to understand that this was just something we were going to have to get through and if we couldn't get through it then it would be okay at least we tried at least I was woman enough to accept everything that came with my relationship for what it was instead of ignoring it is it I know what I want to know you know so this is already started on what you want sentation you know the other stuff like it really it really goes away like you really started mature you know saying like the pain is myself extra set up now you know I'm a little and sorrow I just gotta you know do the things that I need to do my family you know just for them to come out happy and healthy baby it's just a love that everyone deserves to experience and that just really made what me and Jeremy went through all the more worthwhile well we got to see our prize at the end when we got to see exactly what like we created and we knew what role we have to play in these young girls lives he should just learn an amazing job raising two girls tisha I have witnessed her birth team she is so hands-on with those girls like being are progressing so we'll judge yourself judge yourself just no one else but yourself or you where you want to be are you learning what you want to learn do are you giving the love that you won't return together look at all this and Keisha she instill that in them what she has in her those two little girls would be just like the mom we understand that we are all one you know like like even our kids like they like them being here they allowed us to all good ones once we had the kids I just that's why I just felt like because me because because I I just I don't know any kind of kids I always like wanted to make sure the mother my kid is gonna you know no matter what happens to me like I'm always know that they're gonna be good because I know the mother my kids it's amazing he's something you really gotta love that kids and you're really not your kids right you gonna do whatever you got whatever sacrifices you got to do to make sure you know they're there they're gonna be good at another day you know and I'm not on the way that can be good is for me to be here and be here long enough to make sure that you know they taught me just how precious life is I know usually when you are going through life there's always goals that you want you may want you know more shoes a higher degree you may want you know a new job you may want you know a new business for yourself there's just always something you want this sometimes you forget to appreciate the now I think our girls have definitely allowed me to appreciate them now and to love them deeper than I could ever do for my own self when I look at my daughter's I see Keisha like you know and these are my angels right I can't imagine life without her would execute to be honest in his mind when I see them I see her and it's just like you know that just it just brings a warm loving feeling what I'm saying to me to know that they are her kids too you know and we we created this special blessing you know together so you know it just made me realize you know what she really made something for them I want to say about 90% of my registry was purchased from my subscribers 90% plus more I felt so whole knowing that they were loved not only by me and their father and our friends and our family but they have a whole other village of Internet supporters who truly care about them being here and being in this world and being happy and having everything that they need I've never seen something like that and that's when I knew that my good outweighs my bad on my platform despite all the negative when you speak on it and when you pay attention to it that's when it seems like it's out when the good but when you think about it and you really put things in perspective the way that they are my good definitely outweighs my bad and she kind of prepared for this as a career while she was in school watching kids to make money and so actually she would talk to me about that but you know she was doing it to make money and it's flexible to do while she's in school but then it would also be preparing her to have her own children so that she could learn from other parents and then have the hands-on experience so she's she's intentional she's doing her best and she's trying and I think she would like help and guidance and so if people really want to help she'd be willing to listen because she wants to be the best parent like all his demons she's battled alone strictly alone in this world and they it goes her success it goes strictly to her success who she is now that she had to deal with that shit along and she went through everything she went through alone and I don't think she would see that it's like I'm not gonna she is at all I think Keisha was conducted by one of the diamonds that she wears around her neck like something that she had to go through to be where she is today so yeah I in Keisha I am and moving forward whenever people ask who is Keisha I just hope that people could have watched this documentary and been never the fool that I'm human just like you cleaning these bottles out for you guys okay the milk is on his way that's cool but you know what I'm doing you know I get up and I do this I understand that bitch but I understand it but bad but I understand it but a nigger can't nigga can know what they're doing stealing I do it I understand it but just by me but having to do out it please don't people just were like okay nigga you can know how much the Bupa is you doing it up they don't even matter though they don't even matter though because they ain't it you know you wake up every single day and they don't see that type of an understandable is not a point that needs to be proven but I'm just saying for them to understand and hold what you do as a father I'm not better talking about it weird to different people I don't care about putting out a shit and what they say about are they on social media right I don't as long as you know that I'm here every day doing I put a do for them that's how I give a fuck about I'd like to keep it real part of my friends but I'm just being real like I don't I don't care to explain this shit to these people as pleasure I don't my father's I'm a damn good father so I'm definitely so I definitely give a fuck about what they got to say they're gonna say what I want to say anyway Blanca's you everyday lights how do you feel about it [Applause] [Applause] you eat make sure you let them know you about to pay then I got there he told me he was blessed by God he's still in subscribe or follow me we gonna call him out and you can get booted out the line no you're looking up your big vegan yatta real vegans on the other line all these fake being is on their staff they fake vegans up there he halfway believe in God cuz he didn't want to follow me wait Darlene directed me because I've seen you working on the ground I mean doing you see what I hit his name when you both know that my babies they got the best new then kiss actually okay Papa Jesus Jeremy pop-up five-block Jesus and look mom they're gonna turn no which are turned outward oh yeah that's the blue for your hands that is a blueprint for your head cardi B clap step approach alone while she's not going on tour card is tired of the lies exclamation point yeah but like I think it's hard you're not gonna see the cat how you want to live you got so much bad under there Ryan is the name bro blue my business and I'm just I hope that you pulled it from that yeah and I got my hair wet I got my hair wavy I got my sexy outfit oh no shade this in my way no I'm Keisha wait k oh yeah and that's how we lo now I don't own you to my voice my name is chika they thought I was Kaley really my middle name is Shawn say it's crazy guess what I think I was good enough word I should be a rapper yeah I think I could have been a rapper in my early life I really think I can be better than cardi B my name is Keisha and this is my truth I'm sitting in this room but it should have been a booth all I know it's all eyes on me I don't know how to rap and I'm kind of sleepy I want to go in her room and be with my babies my man is that serious and he's doing something crazy like rapping but putting not no music to his fans cuz everybody know where he dude they gonna dance Oh

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Kenyatta (1973 Documentary)



Part Three of ‘The Black Man’s Trilogy; A biographical portrait of Kenya’s first President Jomo Kenyatta and a case study of the “pitfall’s of nationalism” as a political force in Africa narrated by Keefe ‘Simba’ West & Msindo Mwinyipembe , produced and directed by award winning filmmakers Anthony Howarth and David R. Koff.

“A treasure store of old stills, buried newsreels and contemporary interviews, supported by meticulous research and synthesized with the most sensitive acumen. A unique record of what colonialism means in human terms.”—Judy Stone, San Francisco Chronicle

“A rare, penetrating and yet sympathetic look at African nationalism.”—Peter Mwaura, The Standard (Nairobi)

“A solid historical document skewed, valuably, to a distinctive African point of view. By affording a forum for black leaders, past and present, it conveys the sense of an enduring dignity that no colonialist rationalizations can eliminate.”—John J. O’Connor, The New York Times

The Achievers Documentary Trailer


First there was a movie from the Coen brothers called The Big Lebowski then, there was an Explosion of the bizarre
What could have spawned a media frenzy over the course of 5 years, driving over 300,000 hits on the Lebowski Fest website alone and selling out over 17 events from Louisville to London giving birth to a sub culture correctly labeled as Achievers?
What could gather such an eclectic crowd together relegating the best time with one could have with a stranger in a bowling extravaganza?
With interviews from Jeff Bridges and Jim James of “My Morning Jacket”, Director Eddie Chung decided to take a shot on answering this question by creating this amazing documentary with the help of producers Agi Orsi and Cecy Rangel from Riding Giants and Dogtown and Z-Boys.

this thing is the biggest thing I've ever been involved in and it's big and it's huge it's just becoming real you know we have these fests where all these fans get together just like us and we all just like kind of create this strange world of lebowski with nihilus running around and people running around in bathrobes and giant Creedence tape and severed toes the last three years of my life had just been unbelievable housekeepers cured my cancer I am the real Lebowski Chicago trivia championships are coming true I just think it's a weird dream I'm having

Former CIA Chief of Disguise Breaks Down 30 Spy Scenes From Film & TV | WIRED



Jonna Mendez, former CIA Chief of Disguise, takes a look at spy scenes from a variety of television shows and movies and breaks down how accurate they really are.

To learn more, check out Jonna and Tony Mendez’s new book “The Moscow Rules” out now:

The International Spy Museum located in Washington, D.C. is a 501c3 nonprofit with a mission to educate the public about the history and impact of espionage and intelligence. The Museum features the largest collection of international espionage artifacts ever placed on public display. www.spymuseum.org

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Former CIA Chief of Disguise Breaks Down 30 Spy Scenes From Film & TV | WIRED

that's sick hi my name is Johnny Mendez you may recognize her from our previous wired video I was chief of disguise at the CIA today I'm breaking down clips from movies and TV about spies and disguise roll clip this is a box of passports in the Bourne Identity this is not the reality there is no box of passports there are no huge bundles of money no guns this sort of denigrates that the expertise required to do alternate identity documents it's painstaking it's meticulous you check another name for me we don't do them just in case john-michael can they're too precious yeah you do them one by one as they're needed they're not waiting for you around the world I don't know about that picture I don't know who I am dine here homeland traveling along this motor say I'm sorry yes carries disguise which basically consisted of dyeing her hair just get it over with okay I thought was absolutely ineffective still carry with dark hair you think I know that she could have cut her hair and restyled it that's not necessary she could have changed her makeup I had a long day she could have put on some glasses to hide that kind of crazy eyed look that she has that you know tell me jumps out at you when you see her character and what do you mean yeah I didn't think that was effective at all why are you doing this to me in a similar scene in alias she dyes her hair in a bathroom before she goes through security you ever tried this him it's too late for me what do you think what she did was absolutely spot-on thank you and she didn't just dye her hair she dyed it outrageously red and then adopted the whole thing that went with it including chewing gum while she's walking through the airport and then she has that that back-and-forth with with the airline agent I though that was a brilliant thanks this is a great example of distracting someone lipstick use I love a sweet talking to them getting them engaged and getting them away from the things you don't want them looking at window we could have used that as a training film I know long-term alias the Americans have you been in my family his disguises were convincing tell me what you saw he was comfortable in them his wigs were excellent he was never trying to look good he was trying to fit these characters that he had built when it came really close to projecting the little gray man that we always would talk about at CIA that was sometimes often that was the goal you wanted to be forgettable we have to safeguard the air security officers getting into disguise is a lot like method acting the look is part of it but if you're gonna wear it for more than a minute you need to inhabit it have you been Martha that's what he does big day at FBI counterintelligence he becomes the guy in the disguise that the bureaucrat the nerd did you get a look inside this time the actor in him combined with the disguise I thought he was brilliant thank you the next clip is quick changed mission impossible three I've talked about quick-change previously for Wired quick-change is the ability to clandestinely change your appearance you have 37 seconds to come out with those changes it was not unusual for us to layer disguises so you'd have the the true person and then he would wear disguise number one and then on top of that would be disguised number two we would never let that piece of a disguise fly away that's evidence there are three covers that are basically off-limits to CIA and that would be a religious figure Media figure and Peace Corps not that we don't like the Peace Corps we love the Peace Corps but it has to stay kind of pure you got to do what's right it cannot be suspected of harboring CIA officers can you imagine priests are so vulnerable they're just out there if they're accused of being a spy they don't have any structure to protect them they're too vulnerable we also don't use the media as a cover same reason it's good for another example of quick change take a look at Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles now that I got you I think the change into the schoolgirl outfit was actually very well done hearing that demonstrates a great precept that we always operated under and that is that basically the bigger the crowd the more forgiving they are if you want to change your clothes in public you can do lots of things you would never dream of doing no one pays any attention that's the whole point we use that a lot in our training exercises back here right it was always a way to lose surveillance you have surveillance and you have to get away from them to do whatever you need to do practicing surveillance isn't following her face they never are they're following her profile profile was a blonde wearing dark rimmed glasses in a pencil skirt and she just removed all of those pieces it was well done and so to look at another shopping quick-change let's look at baby driver [Applause] [Applause] as you can see this time the alarms go off the intent was good the execution was okay but again you have to ask yourself would we really recommend that because the odds of him getting caught and arrested for shoplifting are just too great if you have everything with you at the beginning and you start revealing it you start removing things and you have a bag where you can store some things and maybe even a bag to put that bag in that works but we don't recommend stealing blending in with the crowd Casino Royale is on the move is on the move and he's heading straight for me stop touching me here [Applause] in this opening scene the man in the crowd was called out from having his hand up he's holding on to his earpiece and he was so caught up in that motion that he forgot and it was a it was a giveaway it started the whole scene we found the way around that by inventing something that didn't exist it was a harness that we was body mourning a receiver that would be in our ear that we never had to touch and an induction loop that went around our neck right so we could receive and it would transmit to the earpiece it was a no hands kind of system perfectly officer choosing disguise Pink Panther I think he would like this one very much I'm particularly part of the enlarged pores right here about looking good oh this scene it was all about looking good are you having those four noses so the officer didn't get to choose which nose he was going to wear we would have made him a custom nose he didn't get to choose the teeth we would have made the team yeah some teeth on the house goatee if it was there do you think you do you think you do a lot of that would have been custom made some of it could be off-the-shelf what we were interested in is giving him a total look that he didn't have to like but he had to wear it we had to feel that he would wear it look what you have done nobody left our labs looking better your genius then after our labs looking different yeah boy the next clip is a worker uniform 24 makes sense to me this entire country will know what we look like in the next few hours people do that with military uniforms there a lot of uniforms that are just universally recognized there are hundreds of video cameras in there oh those are repairmen they're fine anyone asks we're working on the air conditioner get into one of those groups and you disappear and your identity becomes the identity of the group and that's a good thing Ivan agreed it we don't have stores of maintenance uniforms or military uniforms we've got nothing we can arrange anything all right let's get the sofa cover story Argo Ben Affleck is playing my husband Tony Mendez in the movie Argo my name is Tony Mendez the story of an exfiltration one of many ex filtrations that my husband undertook over the years more than 30 years ago we undertook a secret mission to save six Americans trapped in Iran this was a very successful exfiltration I'm gonna get y'all in this particular clip the sixth house guests as we call them we're using the the cover of a Hollywood location scouting team production is a that was a subject they thought they could easily talk about they could talk about Hollywood movie people do and be believable this would be first so as a cover story it was carefully selected don't have any alternatives they came up with a Hollywood location scouting party they're a Canadian film crew on a location scout for a science fiction movie rather than disguise them we more restyled them these cover identities were created specifically for each one of when they were choosing the cover for these six houseguests posing Howard what's his occupation officially it was unique because it was a group of people not just one person they had to find a cover that all six of them could believably speak about leave that you're these people so much that your dream like them looking at Argo gives us an opportunity to look at a real cover story and see how it was executed and see how it was carried off and to see that it performed its function masks Mission Impossible this is pure CGI of course this is what we called an overhead mask we could change your gender we could change your ethnicity we could turn you into almost anything course so we couldn't guarantee that that mask would animate very sorry to hear you say that we were stuck with the measurements that we were presented with what's that masks are always additive you can't put a small nose over a larger nose you have to make sure that your donor and your recipient are well matched probably right we had some aluminum molds that came out of Hollywood they came in large medium and small the size large was an old Hollywood actor named Rex Harrison so he was taking part in a lot of interesting operations without his knowledge I think Jesus let's move on to the second Mission Impossible was mission impossible it's really good you could make a mask with someone underneath it with their with their mouth taped closed but I can't think for the life of me of a purpose for doing that you don't know what you're missing you can still breathe through the nose but it's always a relief to know that you can also breathe through the mouth and so by taping the mouth you you really start restricting their other air intake Freddie's gonna oh joy how did they make these masks let's look at Mission Impossible 3 what if I said we had it so you know when you go to the dentist and you have a dental impression taken that's what we did to your whole face being very careful to keep your your nose open so that you could breathe while this was happening stop talking the mask that we just saw is a mixture of Lights CGI again and there they're flipping back and forth from the real actor to the actor wearing the mask and it's it's invisible to tell where the real actor comes back in and is is animated it's a trick wonderfully done thanks so we'll go to spy hidden identities you'll be given a new identity your name is penny Morgan you're a divorced housewife from Iowa you've sold more Mary Kay products than anyone else in your state it's a pretty funny take on being issued a new a new identity certainly not the identity that she wanted what do I have ten cats is that even illegal she didn't get to choose and the vice president of the Ames Garden Club I couldn't even be president the bits and pieces the the identity cards the things they were issuing to her is what we would call pocket litter no there's the Tim chance those would be the things that any of us would carry around and in our bill folder in our purse that's a new there's a similarity here with the Pink Panther Clinton she didn't like the identity that was being proposed but then she didn't really get to choose was Pepe LePew not available cultural customs inglourious basterds shampoos greg lays it that ominous look tells you that something bad has just happened I'm say let's go ahead British soldier counted wrong on his hands glaze it in Europe when you're counting you start with your thumb one two three doing it this way show to him that he was not even European certainly wasn't German it was a dead giveaway we know from travelling around the world that every country has its own customs and zero foolishness and it's incumbent on us to learn those customs to know those customs and to not violate any of their their procedures this is the infra hot know-how just don't feel sometimes when you've been found out there is no escaping once you've committed one of those errors you you have outed yourself so to speak and you kind of have to go with the consequences whatever those consequences are well if this is it oh boy I hope you don't mind if I go out speaking the Kings gadget room Kingsman I've had a lot of fun with this one of our finest examples of chemical engineering poison the poison in the pen there's a real history to that Shaw thought we put a lot of things in pens they were not equipped and they were not used as weapons in some instances they would conceal a camera but we had a couple of scenarios with agents they said I will work for you but I would like poison actually insist on having an L pill which is a lethal helped me feel because I don't want to give them the opportunity to do what they would like to do to me electrocute the two cases that I know of we put L pills into fountain pens remotely activate and in one case our agent was captured and he was gonna be interrogated and he said before I do that give me my pen I will write my confession and they handed him his pen and he bit down on it on the tip they said he was dead before he hit the floor you know so there's a there's a history to the poison in pens nobody would've these thing couple of the other things in there are less historically correct but wildly entertaining that's he's sick the scientists disguise the saint I'm here to do an interview with that dr. Russell I'm an exposure as a fraud he's wearing a disguise that would send most people away from him and his demeanor is so very pretty imposing and so really frightening in a way she's working a lot out of me that draws attention and you never want to draw attention so I would rate that disguise as a failure glasses as a disguise Superman Lois Lane say hello to Clark Kent poor George Thunder hey anyone who's ever watched Superman wonders Lois can't you see Clark is the newspaper reporter and Superman is the superhero dude me physically they're exactly the same kind of natural Superman's glasses our first impression ridiculous Oh doesn't make sense poor Lois yeah poor Clark breaking in be kind rewind [Applause] is that ladder again what do you think I don't know it was funny the first time I saw it but to a professional I it looks sloppy it looks poorly planned when you plan to an operation you always had Plan B what if it goes wrong go get some ice cream in my office we had people that specialized in going into places that they should not be in I can't be here we're doing and doing things there that they should not do perhaps we think Italy me almost ever speak to you our operations were typically just meticulously planned we never planned to be hiding behind the chain-link fence nevertheless I know some of our people that not that they were caught but that they got stuck where they had to stay in place maybe for a day or two where they could leave some funny stories talking about alias names Austin Powers allow myself to introduce myself my name is Richie Cunningham and this is my wife Oprah awesome powers makes you laugh yeah baby alias names at CIA are closely controlled they are managed they are assigned to you my name is number two you end up with a name for your entire working career come again your true name is never on paper overseas Ruby baby Oprah would probably not be one of those names is my wife Oprah any name that really drew attention would not be one of those names Cunningham was it that she could happen could be but we always had a middle initial danger is my middle name you always had three names I mean you could abbreviate the middle initial but you always had three names Austin danger power my name for a life my first name was faith very shagadelic and so whenever I see anything that has to do with faith like keep the faith baby I'm like okay Oh behave furniture camouflage Sherlock Holmes who delivered this parcel the usual chat New York Curia we never tried to disguise ourselves in the furniture at the CIA but there is a story about James Comey at the White House he was trying to blend into the curtains behind him his suit and the curtains were the same blue wearing a blue suit was trying to blend in with the blue curtain he was trying to hide that way unsuccessfully another furniture camouflage in this next movie called spy hard we used furniture concealments for a number of things technology comes mostly to mind if you had spy gear in your house and you're in a foreign country and it's a controlled society you don't want your receivers and transmitters sitting around so we would build them into selected pieces of furniture trying to remember if we ever had something like that for a person James even when we had some things that we built to exfiltrate people out of the country exfiltration containers could be in various configurations at the International Spy Museum we have an exhibit from checkpoint charlie where a lot of people exfiltrated themselves out of the East a lot of them were in car concealments they would be special spaces built into cars for the purpose of exfiltrating that person across the border undercover accents 22 Jump Street everyone stay in the body or sleepy he'd like to Mexico Wolverine is here and my partner here you want to see that product when he talking yeah first of all you would speak the language you wouldn't try and use an accent no talking about we actually pay some people to study the languages to become fluent in the languages and swipe swipe but it's a made-up thing they seem totally unprepared and you sense that maybe they're gonna get arrested or worse disguising voice the dark night I wanted yogurt you wanted me your Batman has a very specific disguise beyond his voice the voice wasn't really even necessary we're in hockey man we tried to change voices we wouldn't use voice modulation technology but we would try to physically change the palette the palette of your mouth thank to our dismay it did not change your voice it would just make you list forever you could consciously try and change your voice that's like consciously limping after a while you just forget and your regular voice comes back we had no success with that this symbol of open I can never be cover story Fletch names Liddy gordon Liddy Lord take a look at the seventh Fetzer valve oh yeah I think it's been sticking probably humidity maybe I should take a look at it Gordo back here well Fletch has made the mistake of not studying his cover story but well enough before he before he took it on the road right yeah we would always pick a cover story that our people could talk about intelligent lean it's so simple maybe you need a refresher course we would never pick a professional area where they were clueless and where they would come off like Fletch did Gordon yeah I know where it is I'm just getting a bird's-eye view here spy seduction alias stories about seduction in the Espionage business our Allegiance this house in your house some of them are based on truth was a famous seductress that worked for American intelligence during the Cold War who did some amazing things went into a couple of embassies and took some ciphers out of some safe most of the stories though have to do with the Russians and the Germans swear to God the Russians even had a name for it they called him swallows although a friend of mine Jason Matthews wrote a book recently called red Sparrow and he called them sparrows who become the Germans had men who were trained the same way and they called them Romeo's so the use of sex to collect intelligence is not unheard of and it's probably going on today speaking of red Sparrow here's a clip from a seduction scene why would the CIA officer fired his gun according to his story which he says is based on truth they had a school where they trained young women in seduction the only deal in psychological manipulation to quite a degree take off your clothes you can imagine that this was a school that produced graduates you must learn to love on come on and Jennifer Lawrence is supposed to represent one of those successful graduates goodbye Dominika I think it presented to a lot of American audiences the idea that that was you know that's a piece of the intelligence machine in Moscow nobody belongs to the state it takes it to another level now you might want to ask me if the CIA has a school I suppose we'll find out and I would tell you we don't we mustn't be so judgmental this is a typically a Russian technique the state asks something in return clown disguise James Bond's hey is anyone else in there if I human carnival I can't actually say whether a CIA officer has ever changed into a clown suit there was a lot to be said for fitting into your environment into your surroundings correct we're in a clown so you look like one of them instead of an outlier I'm a surgeon so in that regard it makes a point so god fake telling Who I am during the Second World War there was an agent named Virginia Hall who disguised herself as a shepherdess with a flock of sheep to conceal her prosthetic leg and she was lethal general this man's either drunk or crazy this kind of cat suit is a popular trope let's take a look at the Avengers 1998 they use climbing gear but not really black cat suits you must be true I think the reason is because women look so good in them or at least Hollywood women did them most of our men and probably a majority of our women would not have been caught dead in a black cat suit dark athletic clothes are fine technically but not a black cat suit I feel acting drunk with Veronica Mars how long must a girl play drunk and wailing before someone tries to get her to take off her clothes I would not act drunk undercover and I don't think most officers would because it would defeat your purpose I know officers who have gotten drunk undercover but they didn't go in meaning to do that because a lot of the work used to be at those black-tie Affairs where there was a lot of Scotch a lot of liquor running around I think I'd sooner drink mark McGrath's bathwater than drink anything here and we're told at the CIA that there are things that you can drink and eat before you go that will coat your stomach and they'll help they think I'm drunk or worse if you need to appear like you're drinking do that without actually having a you can just tell the bartender I want 7up check out your ways to go about it where you don't get drunk conclusion the writers and directors do everything they can to get it really right half the fun for me is watching closely to see what they get wrong and that's a wrap

Griselda Records Debut Album on Shady Records Documentary Intro – November 29 2019



Stop by the Shady Records Store today and get the bundle for $30 for a limited time:

__

The highly touted Buffalo New York underground rap champions Griselda have announced their long-awaited Shady Records debut LP WWCD for this Friday, November 29th.

The album will feature Eminem, 50 Cent, Raekwon The Chef and more…

Westside Gunn, Conway The Machine and Benny The Butcher, the core of Griselda, have been three of the most prolific artists of the ladder half of the past decade with a rap acumen and grind that brought them from the streets of Buffalo; to cosigns and deals with two of the biggest and most important rappers of all time; a Shady Records label deal and now involvement with Roc Nation Management.

www.instagram.com/griseldarecords
www.twitter.com/griseldarecords

in haar head and change mijn opa is een no go fuck het is dus de opvalt is noem ze er aan een arm een muze was orkanen people of ze in we zouden ze slechts en is dit is bill cosby spijt stem en dus de persoon te zijn techniek i pay more more grammy en ruche economie doel michelle gellar de timing is lekker mijn taille enorme de la recherche zijn is of vlakken shell is dus zo kerntaken en zal lijken lachen della faille john geste wij beiden waren ruiters rode my hand haar huid daarna als we eerder colak hebben daar staat verder dat hij welvaart voor maar vlak na de teller en er zijn de studio om zijn geest nu kennis eens juist browser u wat betreft dancer and glass waar de teller dus gary in angers [Muziek] [Muziek] test voor jonge honden jakkie ze aan de titelbalk review of wat nu te doen naast windas nu gaat vliegen rust daar die sacla cerisia me c

[Teaser Trailer] My Saga – A Star Wars Fan Documentary



My Saga follows the journey of Adam Harris, a husband, father and Star Wars fan. Four years ago, the discovery of a brain tumour and a serious health scare caused Adam to re-evaluate his priorities and follow his dreams.

Star Wars has always been a constant source of joy, comfort and even safety in Adam’s life. When it became apparent his children shared the same deep love and affection for Star Wars, Adam felt compelled to discover just what it is about Star Wars that creates such devoted fans that span across multiple generations, all around the world.

With his son Jack by his side, Adam has spoken with fans, enthusiasts, die-hards as well as cast and crew members from the films. All the while discovering what Star Wars means to him, and the impact it’s had on making him the husband and father he is today.

Every fan has their own saga. This is one.

Visit the official website for the My Saga Documentary –
Help support the Starlight Children’s Foundation by donating or purchasing My Saga merchandise at our store –

my name is Adam Harris I'm a husband a father and a Star Wars fan four years ago I was left with an uncertain future when doctors taught me I have a brain tumor this has spurred me on to live out my dreams so along with my son Jay I'm going to discover what being a star's fan really means well I'm quite nervous I'm not a good flyer that sort of feeling it get that excitement whole crew went off to watch Star Wars and it was just mind-boggling it was just overwhelming there's so much you can be a part of and everybody loves each other I mean I was a bad guy everyone nor is amazed by call Carolyn said all these other clothes for it's it's really a humbling experience to come out and sit and have people appreciate something that he did 30 years ago you know it was a universe I felt safe in Gabe's journey started when he was about six months old he was diagnosed with tuberous sclerosis complex which is a disease that causes tumors to grow in the body maybe that's why this means so much for you it does it really does I want to tell them they're not alone there's a world of people who've been through it and it come out the other end that's arrived you think that's is that a good message why do you think people connect with the Star Wars story do that why in the world would they do that you

Land of Hope and Glory (UK 'Earthlings' Documentary)



Watch in HD. The hidden truth behind UK animal farming – featuring approximately 100 facilities across the UK and never before seen undercover footage.

Support my animal rights activism & projects such as Land of Hope and Glory by becoming part of my Patreon team:

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get in touch – [email protected]

BicycleDreamsTrailer (Documentary)



Bicycle Dreams is the true story of the Race Across America, a 3000-mile bike race that challenges riders to pedal across the country in just ten days. See bicycledreamsmovie.com and bicyclemovies.com for more.
Winner of the following Film Festivals:
Best Documentary Grand Rapids Film Festival
Best Documentary Las Vegas Film Festival
Best Director Yosemite Film Festival
Best Documentary Red Rock Film Festival
Best Foreign Film Moscow Film Festival
Best Documentary Lake Arrowhead Film Festival
Best Sports Documentary Tiburon Film Festival
Best Documentary Breckenridge Film Festival
Best Documentary Los Angeles Sports Film Festival
Royal Reel Award – Canada International Film Festival
Best Documentary Solstice Film Festival (Minnesota)
Best Editing Solstice Film Festival (Minnesota)
Best Soundtrack Solstice Film Festival (Minnesota)
Audience Award Findlay Film Festival Ohio
Audience Award Breckenridge Film Festival (Colorado)

I think we have more people in society now that describe a feeling of missing something there's just something missing in my life and I don't know what's missing but yet they describe something very tangible very very close to them that they're missing and in desire true desire may very well be for for many people what is missing Lance Armstrong said that endurance athletes are running away from something inside of themselves and that's one of the reasons that they do what they do there is no way these people are normal they are the seekers of the new realm or plane we're heading up on 23 hours and Marco's been off the bike for eight minutes total guessing he's gonna go down at about 40 hours without sleep the biggest fear I have and I think most of the people have in this race is it not finish and yet half the people do independent desire is is something that's that that is tricky to tap into sometimes because it requires confidence if that desire starts to falter a little bit they'll crack this next 3040 miles or take you to 300 yeah for the day and that'll be 650 miles in two days you've got a damn good chance I cooked my penny miles and I'll be out because I can't sleep because my eyes are gone but how far the next time station while we go there no I did I don't want to continue this it's not a sporting event in the classic sense it's more of sending a gladiator into a pit with a lion people can say this is a bicycle race no this is nothing you can compare to anything is no bicycle race it's not a sport event this is nothing this is something completely out of this planet you

Master Gardeners of Paradise a proposed documentary film by Darrel Jarmusch



Rough cut of preproduction concept video for “Master Gardeners of Paradise” a proposed documentary feature about the amazingly productive organic farms of Kauai, Hawaii and the master gardeners who created them, by Darrel Jarmusch.

hey suddenly see you guys want to be in my movie in your movie yeah yeah yeah but I want to make a movie about The Master Gardeners of Kauai son I have a proposition for you I want to make movies I want only with a better camera having to get a better camera and I would like to come to your farm and take pictures and interview you on the farm and doing stuff in between yeah Marie I'm making a movie about The Master Gardeners of paradise would you like to be in it turning Dylan you guys want to be in my movie making a movie about The Master Gardeners of Kauai we're really trying to integrate like no-till into our beds just keeping that's you know undisturbed and trying to build fertility from like the top down that's why we go chop the cover crop rather than so what will you do with this cover crop probably just lay it down and then like these two that one was buckwheat and that was kelpies just put a buffalo grass over a chopped-up just to keep anything from getting through and sure kills off the rest of the cover crop all right so um keone and i this is candy I were just about to go out into the orchard and do some Oni with all the rain that we've had the grass has gotten really real yeah it's gotten really so when when we round the mower the grass can be this high and keone is like facing this wall of grass and just sitting here watching it come on so that's what we're about to go out and do the word of the day is well let me go okay mango years old from transplant bang is two years old variety is critical I mean it's critical and also learning to work with your ice cream satin a lot of fruit already the this is a Brooke sleet which is one of our favorites this is your pigeon pea so we've been using these for mulch as he's been in your first thing for three years they've been blown over every which way and it's still grow and they make you know seeds pods are edible dried dried beans are edible and spend all this money for four proceed meal and stuff like that it's right here that soon as they set seed like that you come in and cut them throw them down on the ground for mulch you got Celia got food get serious food for these plant it's a couple few of them sprout here and there and sometimes you leave them and just let it grow again and come back so anything that's like that that can survive must must have something going for it as a life force so we just cut them back put it use it for mulch you can see all of the plants put that so what is the secret to growing a fabulous head of lettuce variety for one selection creating soils they want to be in this is selected asta seed from the eg in Italy fabulous focus they have on quality and which is taste this is best to me best tasting lettuce we inoculate these soils that's over and over and then have quality compost you can look at that this is collection site here all the calls and left auger rod and veggies would ever go into this file and this is vegan there's no manure here so then it gets turned that pile it's turned to another and that sits for being a year it gets turned one more time after that and then when they're going to use it going to sift it and then have a have a more useful product so now you got something and again you're looking at this you don't see a bunch of wood and stuff like that in there so this is done now it's ready to give back so the problem with there's no definition compost really so people just use it in England it's a potting mix that's compost you dig that into these soils you're going to have nitrogen deficiency right off because the high carbon wood content wasn't a wood yeah good test is you take that take that product put it in a bucket of water and see what floats and positive look so it has to feel again so we need a shot at creating a Coppola chair so a sustainable living alternative lifestyle alternative living space that simple give us a shot at doing it thank you so much the

Lone Samaritan – Documentary by Barak Heymann (Scene from the film)



The Samaritans, a tiny religious sect, are dying out. But they still maintain extremely harsh rules against assimilation: if you leave the fold, you and your family are as good as dead. Israeli actress Sophie Tzedaka is one such woman. One by one, she and her three sisters became “Jews” and were excommunicated by their 700-person community. So was their father. “Lone Samaritan” is a touching father-daughter journey that transcends all beliefs. It explores universal issues of faith and modernity, the role of women in religion, and the individual’s right to forge an independent identity—especially when that means violating a tradition you still hold dear.

Written, Directed and Produced by: Barak Heymann
Editor: Neta Dvorkis
Cinematographer: Uri Levi
Original Score: Ehud Banai
Research: Tali-Shamir Werzberger

The film was supported by Channel 8, Makor Foundation for Cinema & TV and Gesher Foundation for Multicultural Cinema.

For more information, visit our website: www.heymannfilms.com

Trailer: History of Afterschool in America Video Documentary



This 2-minute trailer previews the History of Afterschool in America (60 minutes) and how to access the full documentary.

the history of afterschool after-school programs are now part of the community landscape by after-school we're referring to school and community based programs this has been driven by a family need for after-school supervision of youth as well as the need for you to have expanded learning opportunities over 10 million kids across the country are participating in after-school programs few of these workers or other afterschool stakeholders are aware that after-school has been around for a long time or that the important contributions that after school programs have made dating back to the early nineteen hundred's private charities and day nurseries that had services for after-school kids so we're going back due to the large public and private investments after-school is greatly expanded and become a field of its own thus we need to document share and celebrate our history with others think of Education Social Work and medicine each has a documented history we have a growing body of literature and research we can do more to fully document our history in America of course we want all of our kids to be able to be full-fledged members of society where they contribute where they have jobs where they succeed and so we can't ignore this vast amount of time outside the classroom where parents are at home where kids can be learning in this documentary we attempt to tell the full story of the history of after-school it's important role as unique institution serving low-income youth as well as lessons that we can draw from this history we also look at the contemporary after-school field and to the future of afterschool programs

STEPHEN KING'S DOCTOR SLEEP – Final Trailer [HD]



The World Will Shine Again. “Stephen King’s Doctor Sleep” Only in Theaters November 8.
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“Doctor Sleep” continues the story of Danny Torrance, 40 years after his terrifying stay at the Overlook Hotel in The Shining. Ewan McGregor, Rebecca Ferguson and newcomer Kyliegh Curran star in the supernatural thriller, directed by Mike Flanagan, from his own screenplay based upon the novel by Stephen King.
Still irrevocably scarred by the trauma he endured as a child at the Overlook, Dan Torrance has fought to find some semblance of peace. But that peace is shattered when he encounters Abra, a courageous teenager with her own powerful extrasensory gift, known as the “shine.” Instinctively recognizing that Dan shares her power, Abra has sought him out, desperate for his help against the merciless Rose the Hat and her followers, The True Knot, who feed off the shine of innocents in their quest for immortality.
Forming an unlikely alliance, Dan and Abra engage in a brutal life-or-death battle with Rose. Abra’s innocence and fearless embrace of her shine compel Dan to call upon his own powers as never before—at once facing his fears and reawakening the ghosts of the past.

“Doctor Sleep” stars Ewan McGregor (“Star Wars: Episodes I, II & III,” “T2 Trainspotting”) as Dan Torrance, Rebecca Ferguson (the “Mission: Impossible” films, “The Greatest Showman”) as Rose the Hat, and Kyliegh Curran, in her major feature film debut, as Abra. The main ensemble cast also includes Carl Lumbly, Zahn McClarnon, Emily Alyn Lind, Bruce Greenwood, Jocelin Donahue, Alex Essoe and Cliff Curtis.
Trevor Macy and Jon Berg produced the film, with Roy Lee, Scott Lumpkin, Akiva Goldsman and Kevin McCormick serving as executive producers.
Flanagan’s behind-the-scene creative team was led by director of photography Michael Fimognari (“The Haunting of Hill House”), production designers Maher Ahmad (“Get Hard”) and Elizabeth Boller (“Hush”), and costume designer Terry Anderson (“Den of Thieves”). The music score is composed by The Newton Brothers (“The Haunting of Hill House”).
Warner Bros. Pictures presents, An Intrepid Pictures/Vertigo Entertainment Production, A Mike Flanagan Film, “Doctor Sleep.” Slated for release in North America on November 8, 2019, and globally beginning on October 30, 2019, “Doctor Sleep” will be distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures.

The Crosses Trailer – Open City Documentary Festival


Only days after the 1973 military coup against the Allende government, a group of nineteen union members in a paper factory were disappeared without trace. The case remained a mystery for forty years, until a policeman involved in the massacre finally broke the pact of silence. Taking his confession alongside testimony from the victims’ families —all voiced by actors—the filmmakers forensically unravel the events leading to the murders, using stark 16mm photography to depict the landscape like a crime scene. A bold and formally rigorous work, The Crosses bravely unearths a dark moment in Chile’s political history that for years had been buried in silence.

AVICII TRUE STORIES: Documentary Website Case Movie



This is a case video of the official documentary website, created for Avicii’s upcoming film in October. Web design, development, and motion.

Full portfolio case

Pontus Wellgraf

Anders Åberg

Official website

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All rights reserved to Avicii and the creators for its trailer, song, and cover in this footage. This is a showcase video of the website production only.

7 Things to Know About Making Short Films! : FRIDAY 101



This week, Russell goes over seven important things to know about short films, from efficient exposition, to what the best length is when submitting to film festivals! If you have anything that you would add to this list, leave them in the comments below!

This week’s links:

List of Short Film Oscar Nomination Qualifying Festivals:

Martin Scorsese’s “The Big Shave”:
Peluca (The short film that became Napoleon Dynamite):
BMWFilms’ “The Hire” Series:

If you have a question, are seeking advice (FILMMAKING advice, Russ is NOT, in fact, a licensed therapist), or were just wondering about anything at all film or video related, send an email to:
[email protected]
Even quick, simple questions will do.

Have something to add to any of the topics we discussed on this episode? Send us a video response, or a Youtube link via email, and record yourself weighing in!

If you have made a movie and want advice as to how it could be better, send a Youtube link, listed or unlisted, to:
[email protected]
and let Russell know you want your movie put on THE CHOPPING BLOCK!

Intro Video by Anthony De Coninck (aka Stylow)

Theme Music by Abhilash Buch

Additional Music by Kevin MacLeod
“Covert Affair”
“Who Likes to Party”

Taste of Hope Clip – Open City Documentary Festival


Is there a viable alternative for commerce to that offered by capitalism? Taste of Hope offers one possibility in the form of a tea factory in France owned by a workers’ collective. After spending years struggling to gain control from Unilever, they now face a new challenge as their idealism clashes with the harsh realities of the market. An elegantly crafted observational film, Laura Coppens’ attentive anthropological feature guides us through the factory floor into general assemblies and out into the supermarket, as the collective try to reconcile their utopian vision of communal existence with the ever present stress of the bottom line.

THE GIANTS OF MONGOLIA DOCUMENTARY



The dinos are owned by the makers of JWE and sounds by purple mash

it's now door it is now dawn over a silent forest a few thousand meters from the equator this is a desert and it is now around 4 a.m. in the morning as always in the morning a few Gallimimus around a hug the lead female has found something it's a snake and it gets plucked off the ground and lifted into its mouth youngsters struggle with the feeding nearby some Sarala fuss move in with some takia they sleep until they find the dead Monica's the killer is Tarbosaurus and some velociraptors approaches arrow tops has recently been bought down but the Tarbosaurus never realized that there's a Takia nearby and it meets its end

Here Are Some Of Netflix's BEST Documentaries



From “Blackfish” to “American Factory,” these films will leave you learning something you never thought about before.

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Lützen 1632 – THIRTY YEARS' WAR DOCUMENTARY



Another episode in our animated historical documentary series on the Thirty Years’ War with the battles of Lech, Nuremberg and Lützen as Gustavus Adolphus continues to fight for the Protestant cause against the Catholic leaders Tilly and Wallenstein.

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The script for this video was developed by Matt Hollis

This video was narrated by Officially Devin (

Machinimas were made on Total War: Attila engine (

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Get Out – In Theaters This February – Official Trailer



In Universal Pictures’ Get Out, a speculative thriller from Blumhouse (producers of The Visit, Insidious series and The Gift) and the mind of Jordan Peele, when a young African-American man visits his white girlfriend’s family estate, he becomes ensnared in a more sinister real reason for the invitation.

Now that Chris (Daniel Kaluuya, Sicario) and his girlfriend, Rose (Allison Williams, Girls), have reached the meet-the-parents milestone of dating, she invites him for a weekend getaway upstate with Missy (Catherine Keener, Captain Phillips) and Dean (Bradley Whitford, The Cabin in the Woods).

At first, Chris reads the family’s overly accommodating behavior as nervous attempts to deal with their daughter’s interracial relationship, but as the weekend progresses, a series of increasingly disturbing discoveries lead him to a truth that he could have never imagined.

Equal parts gripping thriller and provocative commentary, Get Out is written and directed by Peele (Key and Peele) and produced by Blumhouse’s Jason Blum, as well as Sean McKittrick (Donnie Darko, The Box), Peele and Edward H. Hamm Jr. (The Box, Bad Words). The film also stars Caleb Landry Jones (X-Men series), Milton “Lil Rel” Howery (The Carmichael Show), Betty Gabriel (The Purge: Election Year), Marcus Henderson (Pete’s Dragon) and Keith Stanfield (Straight Outta Compton).

Get Out – In Theaters This February

#GetOut #JordanPeele #DanielKaluuya

Blood, Sweat & Teeth (Full Movie – MMA Cage Fighting Documentary – 2000)



Cage match fighting at its gloriest! This film is chock full of high intensity extreme cage fighting and does not stop until the blood sweat and teeth hit the floor. For any extreme fighting fan Blood Sweat & Teeth should not be missed.
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Blood, Sweat & Teeth
Country of origin: USA
Release date: 2000
Language: English
Genre: Documentary/Sports/MMA

Director: Adam Warren
Stars: Matthew Waller

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