ANOTHER EARTH | KEPLER 186F – Full Documentary

ANOTHER EARTH | KEPLER 186F - Full Documentary



If Alien exist where do they live and how do they live?
Scientists say a world that’s 490 light-years away qualifies as the first confirmed Earth-sized exoplanet that could sustain life as we know it — but in an environment like nothing we’ve ever seen.
The planet, known as Kepler-186f, is “more of an Earth cousin than an Earth twin,” Elisa Quintana, an astronomer at the SETI Institute at NASA Ames Research Center, told the journal Science. Quintana is the lead author of a report on the planet published by Science this week.
“This discovery does confirm that Earth-sized planets do exist in the habitable zones of other stars,” Quintana said during a Thursday news briefing at NASA Headquarters.
Kepler-186f goes around an M-type dwarf star that’s smaller and cooler than our sun. But it orbits much closer to its parent star than Earth does, within what would be Mercury’s orbit in our own solar system. Those two factors combine to produce an environment that could allow for liquid water on the surface, assuming that the planet had a heat-trapping atmosphere.

“The star, to our eyes, would look slightly orange-y,” about a third again as big as our sun but only a third as bright, said co-author Thomas Barclay, a staff scientist for NASA’s Kepler mission who is also affiliated with NASA and the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute. At midday, Kepler-186f’s landscape might look similar to what we see on Earth an hour before sunset, he told NBC News.
Or it might not: If the planet lacked an atmosphere to retain and redistribute its sun’s warmth, it would be a cold, dry, lifeless world.

Kepler-186f probably rates as the most potentially Earthlike planet discovered so far, said Jim Kasting, a geoscientist at Penn State University who did not play a role in the Science study. But he told NBC News that it’s still “less likely to be habitable than planets around more sunlike stars.” Even better prospects for alien habitability might well be identified in the months and years to come.

How the world was found

Kepler-186f is just the latest discovery to be pulled out of terabytes’ worth of data collected by the Kepler mission. Before it went on the fritz last year, the Kepler space telescope stared at more than 150,000 stars in a patch of sky, looking for the telltale dimming of starlight as planets passed over the stars’ disks. Nearly 1,000 exoplanets have been confirmed using Kepler data, and almost 3,000 more candidates are still awaiting confirmation.

It takes years of observation to confirm the pattern of dimming and brightening that’s associated with alien planets, particularly if the planets are small and far from their parent stars. In February, astronomers reported that at least four worlds circled the dwarf star known as Kepler-186 or KOI-571. In this week’s Science paper, Quintana and her colleagues confirm the existence of Kepler-186f as the fifth and outermost world.
They report that Kepler-186f is about 10 percent wider than Earth, tracing a 130-day orbit around its sun at a mean distance of 0.35 astronomical units. (An astronomical unit is the distance between Earth and our sun, which is 93 million miles or 150 million kilometers.) That would put Kepler-186f on the cooler, outer side of the star’s habitable zone — the range of orbital distances where liquid water could exist on a planet’s surface.

Astronomers have confirmed the existence of other planets in their stars’ habitable zone, but those prospects are super-Earth-size. Smaller habitable-zone candidates also have been found, but they have yet to be confirmed as planets.

Barclay said Kepler-186f was particularly promising because it’s less than 1.5 times the size of Earth. Planets in that size range are more likely to be rocky with a thinner atmosphere, like Earth, Mars and Venus. But worlds exceeding that size stand a better chance of retaining a thick atmosphere of hydrogen and helium, like the giant planet Neptune.

“While those planets also could be rocky, they don’t remind us of home,” Barclay said.
Could we actually detect signs of life on Kepler-186f? That’s a tough one. The astronomers behind the discovery acknowledge that the planet might be just too far away for follow-up studies. The SETI Institute has been searching for radio signals from the Kepler-186 system over a wide frequency range (1 to 10 GHz), but so far nothing has been detected.

(Advexon)

24 thoughts on “ANOTHER EARTH | KEPLER 186F – Full Documentary”

  1. The DNA CODE indicates that it can't just depend on the presence of the material which life is made of. So the video's premise is flawed, and if the premise is flawed, then all the rest based on it is drivel.

  2. The odds that a planet that humans can live on without breathing apparatus is extremely minute. Organisms like humans evolve to live in a specific atmospheric matrix, the odds another planet has developed a similar atmosphere is probably just a few out of billions.

  3. But…even if we found another planet like Earth, and intelligent life on it, what would change? Nothing. It changes nothing. We still have all the same problems and everything carries on as normal. I don't really see the point of this as a scientific pursuit. Whether or not there is life elsewhere should be irrelevant to our plans.

  4. http://www.futureofmankind.co.uk/Billy_Meier/Humanoid_lifeforms_in_the_known_universe Quetzal:CONTACT REPORT 228
    106. Known to us, in this galaxy, are only 2,630,000 highly developed human civilizations, which actually belong together, whereby, from other galaxies known to us, a further 1,141,000,000 can be factored in.
    107. We know of 1,040,000 civilizations which are developed to an essentially low level in this galaxy which you call the Milky Way.
    108. Our scientists estimate that in the entire universe about 6,000,000,000,000 to 7,000,000,000,000 essentially human civilizations, of higher and lower form, would have to exist in your material space-time configuration. The Big Bang created our universe 46 trillion years ago (46,000,000,000,000 as opposed to current Earth scientists' estimation of 16,000,000,000).
    Approximately 1,500,000,000,000 years after the Big Bang the first solid matter came into existence.
    Sister or twin or parallel universe to the DAL Universe.
    40 trillion years ago were formed the first solid matter.
    39 trillion years ago were formed the first hominid lifeforms.
    40,353,607 original human races created by Creation.
    343 different skins colours.
    The Milky Way now has 7.5 million human civilisations.
    Billions of races now exist in the universe.
    Due to merging of races.
    The stars in our universe are much more spread apart than in the DAL Universe. http://www.futureofmankind.co.uk/Billy_Meier/Humanoid_lifeforms_in_the_known_universe

  5. http://www.futureofmankind.co.uk/Billy_Meier/DERN_Universe DERN UNIVERSE- Our universe.
    * The Big Bang created our universe 46 trillion years ago (46,000,000,000,000 as opposed to current Earth scientists' estimation of 16,000,000,000).
    * Approximately 1,500,000,000,000 years after the Big Bang the first solid matter came into existence.
    * Sister or twin or parallel universe to the DAL Universe.
    * 40 trillion years ago were formed the first solid matter.
    * 39 trillion years ago were formed the first hominid lifeforms.
    * 40,353,607 original human races created by Creation.
    * 343 different skins colours.
    * The Milky Way now has 7.5 million human civilisations.
    * Billions of races now exist in the universe.
    * Due to merging of races.
    * The stars in our universe are much more spread apart than in the DAL Universe. http://www.futureofmankind.co.uk/Billy_Meier/DERN_Universe

  6. I know this sounds bazaar but what if the only way to travel to different planets is through our minds? Our minds are faster than the speed of light, There is something in us that we have to unlock. Rockets are manmade, they will only get us so far. I believe there’s a more natural/spiritual way to this idk.

  7. wait okay so i just paused the video and idk if they go over this later on, but with a bigger planet that's only ocean that could possibly sustain life, could't that also mean marine life would possibly be bigger, if any at all?

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